Why reducing the risk of nuclear war should be a key concern of our generation

Max Roser at Our World in Data: Cities that are attacked by nuclear missiles burn at such an intensity that they create their own wind system, a firestorm: hot air above the burning city ascends and is replaced by air that rushes in from all directions. The storm-force winds fan … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 5 days ago

Salman Rushdie’s entire life has been an act of defiance

Suzanne Nossel in The Guardian: The attack on Rushdie is a wake-up call for all of us who have a stake in free expression, which is all of us, period. While we do not yet know the motives of his attackers, it is hard to envisage a scenario in which this brazen, premeditated attac … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 5 days ago

Salman Rushdie and the Power of Words

Adam Gopnik in The New Yorker: The terrorist assault on Salman Rushdie on Friday morning, in western New York, was triply horrific to contemplate. First in its sheer brutality and cruelty, on a seventy-five-year-old man, unprotected and about to speak—doubtless cheerfully and elo … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 5 days ago

The delights of mischief

Alex Moran in aeon: Now let it work, mischief, thou art afoot. Take thou what course thou wilt! — from William Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar (Act III, Scene II) One of the stranger sights on the University College London campus is the clothed skeleton of the utilitarian philosopher … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 5 days ago

Lamont Dozier (1941 – 2022) Motown Legend

Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 5 days ago

Judith Durham (1943 – 2022) Singer/Songwriter

Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 5 days ago

Olivia Newton-John (1948 – 2022) Singer/Songwriter

Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 5 days ago

Hopelessness?

Branko Milanovic over at his substack Global Inequality and More 3.0: That today’s world situation is the worst since the end of the Second World War is not an excessive, nor original, statement. As we teeter on the brink of a nuclear war, it does not require too  many words to c … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 6 days ago

Why the US Dollar Is Booming and Creating a Possible Doom Loop

Odd Lots interviews Jon Turek: | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 6 days ago

Anti-Liberal

Terry Eagleton in Sidecar [h/t: Leonard Benardo]: A well-known member of the British left once discovered to his surprise that several of his socialist friends, including myself, had all attended the same school. We weren’t, however, public schoolboys in flight from our privilege … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 6 days ago

Humans Know a Lot, This Author Concedes, and Most of It Is Useless

Jennifer Szalai in The New York Times: Gregg studies animal behavior and is an expert in dolphin communication. He shows how human cognition is extraordinarily complex, allowing us to paint pictures and write symphonies. We can share ideas with one another so that we don’t have t … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 6 days ago

Republicans went crazy over the Trump search. Now they look idiotic

Max Boot in The Washington Post: The more we learn about the FBI’s search of Mar-a-Lago, the sillier — and more sinister — the overcaffeinated Republican defenses of former president Donald Trump look. A genius-level spinmeister, Trump set the tone with a Monday evening statement … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 6 days ago

Saturday Poem

Always We Begin Again Today you could wake up and say, It doesn’t have to be complicated— life, that is, in the way a forest overtakes the scourge of the machine. Eventually, the scar will be covered first by high grasses and flowering weeds, then shoulder high pines that spine t … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 6 days ago

‘We Could Have Been Friends, My Father and I’ by Raja Shehadeh

Ian Black at The Guardian: Raja Shehadeh, the well-known Palestinian author, was born in 1951 in the West Bank town of Ramallah (under Jordanian rule), three years after Israel was founded. His father, Aziz, was born in Bethlehem in 1912 (then part of the Ottoman empire), five ye … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 6 days ago

Raja Shehadeh On Britain And Palestine, A Family History

Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 6 days ago

RETAIL GANGSTER: The Insane, Real-Life Story of Crazy Eddie

Alexandra Jacobs at the NYT: The most famous TV ad in the Orwellian year of 1984, carefully themed to the novel named for this year, was for the Apple Macintosh desktop computer. The most infamous were those for Crazy Eddie, a chain of discount electronics stores in the New York … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 6 days ago

From Rushdie’s friend: “Always support free speech, especially speech we hate. Otherwise there’s no hope at all.”

Note: Salman is a closer friend of my sister Azra, but I know I also speak for her when I say that we are devastated by the terrible news we have received this evening and hope for his speedy and complete recovery. Cynthia Haven in The Book Haven: For most of us, Salman Rushdie i … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 7 days ago

The Case for Shorttermism

Robert Wright in Nonzero Newsletter: Effective altruism—EA for short—is a pretty straightforward extension of utilitarian moral philosophy and drew much of its founding inspiration from the most famous living utilitarian philosopher, Peter Singer. The basic idea is that you shoul … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 7 days ago

Of Craft and Matter

Antonio Muñoz Molina at Hudson Review: The foreground of the most looked-at painting in the museum is partly taken up by a painting seen from the back. Everything in Las Meninas seems overt and at the same time is deceptive. The mystery of what may or may not be painted on the ca … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 7 days ago

A Buffalo Photographer’s Dignified Look at the Passage of Time

Richard Brody at The New Yorker: In the early nineties, I worked briefly as an assistant editor at Aperture, a job that involved considering unsolicited submissions of photographs. It was my good fortune that one such set of submissions was delivered to the office by the photogra … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 7 days ago

Milton Rogovin: The Forgotten Ones

Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 7 days ago

How effective altruism went from a niche movement to a billion-dollar force

Dylan Matthews in Vox: It’s safe to say that effective altruism is no longer the small, eclectic club of philosophers, charity researchers, and do-gooders it was just a decade ago. It’s an idea, and group of people, with roughly $26.6 billion in resources behind them, real and gr … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 7 days ago

Friday Poem

Origin of Violence There is a hole. In the hole is everything people will do to each other. The hole goes down and down. It has many rooms like graves and like graves they are all connected. Roots hang from the dirt in craggy chandeliers. It’s not clear where the hole stops begin … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 7 days ago

Against the Pursuit of Happiness

Shayla Love in Vice Media: In the last week of December 1999, a group of researchers emailed their friends, colleagues, and various listservs to ask about their plans for New Year’s Eve. They recorded how big a party a person planned to attend, how much fun they expected to have, … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 7 days ago

The big idea: are we living in a simulation?

Steven Poole in The Guardian: Elon Musk thinks you don’t exist. But it’s nothing personal: he thinks he doesn’t exist either. At least, not in the normal sense of existing. Instead we are just immaterial software constructs running on a gigantic alien computer simulation. Musk ha … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 7 days ago

Henry Somers-Hall at Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews: While there are references to Kierkegaard scattered through Gilles Louis René Deleuze’s work, these references have largely been overshadowed by the more pronounced (and less overtly ambivalent) influence of Nietzsche on Dele … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 8 days ago

The Choreography Of Chicken Soup

Editors at The Paris Review: The seventies and eighties were a high point in American dance, and consequently, dance on television. As video technologies advanced, one-off performances inaccessible to most could be seamlessly captured and broadcast to the masses. Like all art for … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 8 days ago

Farewell, Olivia Newton-John: Why We Honestly Loved Her

Rob Sheffield in Rolling Stone: Farewell, Olivia Newton-John, the eternally beloved pop queen who died Monday at age 73. No Seventies star had a weirder pop trajectory, going from the world’s favorite Australian country singer to a brazen Eighties black-leather New Wave diva in j … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 8 days ago

Sean Carroll’s Mindscape Podcast: Simon Conway Morris on Evolution, Convergence, and Theism

Sean Carroll in Preposterous Universe: Evolution by natural selection is one of the rare scientific theories that resonates within the wider culture as much as it does within science. But as much as people know about evolution, we also find the growth of corresponding myths. Simo … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 8 days ago

Ken Roth: Saving Lives in Time of War

Ken Roth at Human Rights Watch: The alternative to war constrained by the laws of armed conflict, or international humanitarian law, is what is known as total war—war fought without any effort to minimize harm to civilians; indeed, war fought to maximize civilian harm as a delibe … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 8 days ago

Steven Pinker: How The Brain Makes Sense Of The Auditory World

 | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 8 days ago

Thursday Poem

The Moon is Trans The moon is trans. From this moment forward, the moon is trans. You don’t get to write about the moon anymore unless you respect that. You don’t get to talk to the moon anymore unless you use her correct pronouns. You don’t get to send men to the moon anymore un … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 8 days ago

How Salman Toor Left the Old Masters Behind

Calvin Tomkins in The New Yorker: Three weeks before Salman Toor’s “No Ordinary Love” opened at the Baltimore Museum of Art, on May 22nd, the twenty-six paintings in the exhibition were still in his Brooklyn studio, and the largest work, “Fag Puddle with Candle, Shoe and Flag,” r … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 8 days ago

Female monkeys with female friends live longer

Elizabeth Kivowitz in Phys.Org: Female white-faced capuchin monkeys living in the tropical dry forests of northwestern Costa Rica may have figured out the secret to a longer life—having fellow females as friends. “As humans, we assume there is some benefit to social interactions, … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 8 days ago

In Our Time: Angkor Wat

Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 9 days ago

The Measuring Muse

Peter Filkins at Salmagundi: The role of poet-critics is a special one in any literature. Practitioners of the art, they also reveal its underpinnings, an activity that involves more than a mere thumbs-up-or-down review. Instead, by shaping whom and how we read, their influence c … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 9 days ago

Letter from Japan

Charles De Wolf at Commonweal: Still, national images are always subject to fluctuation, and at least in the West, historical shifts in the perception of Japan have been particularly dramatic. A much darker view of the country—as a land of ferocious militarists caught up in a dea … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 9 days ago

Wednesday Poem

Sun To God The children walked. Then they began to run. Why are we running, one asked? No one knew. They ran faster. They began laughing. Why are we laughing? Not one knew. They laughed more. It was the eve of war but they didn’t know. The children walked. The children’s parents … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 9 days ago

On the Life and Work of Buckminster Fuller

Pradeep Niroula in the Los Angeles Review of Books: It just so happens Fuller’s popular legacy is bloated, like the geodesic domes he is most easily identified with today. Alec Nevala-Lee’s new biography, Inventor of the Future, fact-checks Fuller’s legend and then corrects the r … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 9 days ago

Nick Lane: Why Conventional Wisdom About Cancer Can Be Misleading

Nick Lane at Literary Hub: The idea that mutations cause cancer remains the dominant paradigm. A special issue of Nature from 2020 wrote: “Cancer is a disease of the genome, caused by a cell’s acquisition of somatic mutations in key cancer genes.” Yet over the last decade it has … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 9 days ago

The crisis mindset is a finite resource — and we’ve exhausted it

Taylor Dotson in The New Atlantis: In 1968, Paul Ehrlich predicted impending famine and social collapse driven by overpopulation. He compared the threat to a ticking bomb — the “population bomb.” And the claim that only a few years remain to prevent climate doom has become a fami … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 9 days ago

John Allen Paulos: Who’s Counting? Uniting Numbers and Narratives

 | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 9 days ago

The Myths of Lady Rochford, the Tudor Noblewoman Who Supposedly Betrayed George and Anne Boleyn

Meilan Solly in Smithsonian: In popular culture, Tudor noblewoman Jane Boleyn is often portrayed as a petty, jealous schemer who played a pivotal role in the downfall of Anne Boleyn, the second of Henry VIII’s six wives. According to historians and fiction writers alike, Jane (al … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 9 days ago

Stuck With Trump

David Frum in The Atlantic: You might think that the FBI search at Mar-a-Lago yesterday would provide a welcome opportunity for a Trump-weary Republican Party. This would be an entirely postpresidential scandal for Donald Trump. Unlike his two impeachments, this time any legal je … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 9 days ago

Jana Prikryl’s ‘Midwood’

Dustin Illingworth at Poetry Magazine: For artists, middle age is freighted with aesthetic drama. For poets, it’s also often a period of formal metamorphoses. Midlife crisis is a term too loaded with risible associations to be useful here. The transformation seems more a matter o … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 10 days ago

Poetry: Jana Prikryl

Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 10 days ago

On Sarah Derbew’s “Untangling Blackness in Greek Antiquity”

Najee Olya at the LARB: Derbew’s book arrives at a pivotal moment in classical studies. The past years have seen debates on the whiteness of the discipline and calls to burn the field down. The very term “classics” has come under fire for its perceived elitism and opacity, with e … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 10 days ago

The Mysterious Dance of the Cricket Embryos: The secret is geometry

Siobhan Roberts in The New York Times: Humans, frogs and many other widely studied animals start as a single cell that immediately divides again and again into separate cells. In crickets and most other insects, initially just the cell nucleus divides, forming many nuclei that tr … | Continue reading


@3quarksdaily.com | 10 days ago