Roaring Girl: London’s Sharp-Elbowed, Loudmouthed Mary Frith (2017)

The phenomenon of the London “Roaring Girl” reached its apotheosis in the form of Mary Frith, a smoking, cursing, thieving, braggart who spoke and—most shocking of all—dressed like a man. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 6 days ago

Russia’s Dr. Seuss

Name: Kornei Chukovsky. Dates: 1882 to 1969. Number of supremo-supremo classic children’s books to his credit: ten or twelve. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 9 days ago

The Art of Screenwriting – Billy Wilder

 Billy Wilder, one of American cinema’s premiere writer-directors, has always maintained that movies are “authored,” and has always felt that much of a film’s direction ideally should take place in the writing. Like many of the medium’s great fi … | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 14 days ago

The Other Billy Collins

William Collins—“Poor Collins” to his contemporaries. 1721–1759: dead, completely incapacitated and insane, at thirty-seven. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 16 days ago

Comics as Poetry

Ivan Brunetti on Lynda Barry, and all the things that can happen in the space of four panels. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 27 days ago

John Fowles (1989)

Photograph of John Fowles by Carolyn Djanogly  John Fowles was born in Leigh-on-Sea, Essex, on March 31, 1926. He attended Bedford School (1940–1944) and then served nearly two years in the Royal Marines. After his four years at Oxford (New College), where he read … | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 1 month ago

The Myth of Self-Reliance

Jenny Odell on an encounter with Emerson’s ‘Essays

.’ | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 1 month ago

The Horsewomen of the Belle Époque

The lives of these horsewomen were filled with ambiguity and dare-devilry, sex and sexism, glamor and skill. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 1 month ago

The Limits of Standard English

To deem African American Vernacular English “bad” English isn’t just racist—from a linguistic standpoint, it’s also entirely incorrect. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 1 month ago

A Figure Model’s (Brief) Guide to Poses Through Art History

It paid $12.50 an hour with clothes on, $25 with clothes off. The choice, I figured, was obvious. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 2 months ago

What fiction does is sneak up on the truth (1979)

 The following interview incorporates three done with John Gardner over the last decade of his life. After interviewing him in 1971, Frank McConnell wrote of the thirty-nine-year-old author as one of the most original and promising younger American novelists. His first four … | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 2 months ago

My ideal for writing is to put Dostoyevsky and Chandler together in one book

The author at his jazz club, Peter Cat, in 1978. Haruki Murakami is not only arguably the most experimental Japanese novelist to have been translated into English, he is also the most popular, with sales in the millions worldwide. His greatest novels inhabit the liminal zone … | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 2 months ago

Tennessee

Tennessee Williams, ca. 1965. Photograph by Orlando Fernandez. In Chicago, Williams was hard at work on the production of a new play being done at the Goodman Theater. It was a humorous and moving work called A House Not Meant to Stand, the title of which was his commen … | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 2 months ago

Feminize Your Canon: Iris Origo

Iris Origo might be the most self-effacing writer ever to gain renown as a diarist. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 2 months ago

The Wilderness of the Unfinished Manuscript

I was in that hollow tunnel where no one asks anymore how the book is coming. I could no longer see the origin point. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 3 months ago

Isak

 Illustration by Michael Batterberry, 1956. It was, in a sense, type-casting when a few years ago a film was planned that would have shown us Garbo playing the role of Isak Dinesen in a screen version of Out of Africa, for the writer is, like the actress, a My … | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 3 months ago

Carnival and Chaos: Herbert Gold in San Francisco

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@theparisreview.org | 3 months ago

Cooking with Shirley Jackson

Valerie Stivers cooks up a menu inspired by Shirley Jackson, including dandelion pie, peanut brittle, and deathly sweet blackberries. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 3 months ago

The Deceptive Simplicity of ‘Peanuts’

The true undergirding of lasting works of art is the embrace of contradictions, and ‘Peanuts’ is no exception. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 4 months ago

The Soviet Children Who Survived World War II

Svetlana Alexievich’s newly translated ‘Last Witnesses’ weaves together accounts from Soviets whose childhoods were torn apart by World War II. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 4 months ago

Calvino

 Upon hearing of Italo Calvino’s death in September of 1985, John Updike commented, “Calvino was a genial as well as brilliant writer. He took fiction into new places where it had never been before, and back into the fabulous and ancient sources of narrative.&rdq … | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 4 months ago

E. M. Forster, The Art of Fiction No. 1 (1953)

“That is not all of Arctic Summer—there is almost half as much of it again—but that’s all I want to read because now it goes off, or at least I think so, and I do not want my voice to go out into the air while my heart is sinking. It will be more interesti … | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 4 months ago

Voyage Around My Cell

In my cell, unlike in Xavier de Maistre’s room, there are no pictures, no trinkets, no sofas, no armchairs. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 4 months ago

The Perseverance of Eve Babitz’s Vision

To read Eve Babitz is to feel like her passenger, cruising down long Hollywood streets through a painted-backdrop sunset toward eternal waves. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 4 months ago

Are We All Living in a Simulation?

This theory, argued by futurists and tech visionaries, holds that we live all in an intricately detailed game cooked up by a demigod, hacker or AI mastermind. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 4 months ago

Literary paint chips: Paint samples sourced from colors in literature

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@theparisreview.org | 4 months ago

A Primer for Forgetting

The finished task drops into oblivion. The unfinished clings to the mind. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 5 months ago

The Intelligence of Plants

What if plants are smarter than we think — a lot smarter? | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 5 months ago

Demystifying Poetic Meter

Frankie Thomas demystifies poetic meter. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 5 months ago

Books Won't Die

Relax. Predictions of the impending obsolescence of books have been proven wrong time and again. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 5 months ago

How to Listen to Music

Advice from music scholars on how to select and listen to music more intentionally. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 6 months ago

More UFOs Than Ever Before

In the last century, UFO sightings have spiked—Rich Cohen explores why. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 6 months ago

Don DeLillo, The Art of Fiction No. 135

Don DeLillo, ca. 2011. Photograph by Thousandrobots A man who’s been called “the chief shaman of the paranoid school of American fiction” can be expected to act a little nervous.I met Don DeLillo for the first time in an Irish restaurant in Manhattan, for a … | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 6 months ago

Sartre’s Bad Trip

In the thirties, both Jean-Paul Sartre and Walter Benjamin experimented with the hallucinogenic drug mescaline. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 6 months ago

Arthur Miller, the Art of Theater No. 2 (1966)

Arthur Miller. Arthur Miller’s white farmhouse is set high on the border of the roller-coaster hills of Roxbury and Woodbury, in Connecticut’s Litchfield County. The author, brought up in Brooklyn and Harlem, is now a county man. His house is surrounded by t … | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 6 months ago

Three Letters from Switzerland by Zelda Fitzgerald

While she was a patient at Les Rives de Prangins, Zelda Fitzgerald wrote letters to F. Scott Fitzgerald detailing the nonevents of her days. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 6 months ago

David Foster Wallace’s Pen Pal

A poet manqué’s decades-long correspondence with DFW, and why she sold the letters. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 6 months ago

The Creative Compulsions of OCD

Controlling a sentence—controlling this sentence, as I type—is for me the best, most pleasurable work there is. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 6 months ago

Scheele’s Green, the Color of Fake Foliage and Death

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@theparisreview.org | 6 months ago

The Birth of the Semicolon

The semicolon has long been a source of both enthusiasm and disdain. But how did this peculiar punctuation mark come about? | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 7 months ago

The Birth of the Semicolon

The semicolon has long been a source of both enthusiasm and disdain. But how did this peculiar punctuation mark come about? | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 7 months ago

The Crane Wife

Ten days after calling off her engagement, CJ Hauser travels to the Gulf Coast to live among scientists and whooping cranes. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 7 months ago

Always the Model, Never the Artist

You’ve already seen Berthe Morisot even if you’ve never heard of her. A new exhibit finally gives her her due as a painter. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 7 months ago

The Aesthetic Beauty of Math

The best mathematics, like the best literature, will continue to cause intense emotional satisfaction to thousands of people after thousands of years. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 7 months ago

Simone de Beauvoir, The Art of Fiction No. 35

 Simone de Beauvoir had introduced me to Jean Genet and Jean-Paul Sartre, whom I had interviewed. But she hesitated about being interviewed herself: “Why should we talk about me? Don’t you think I’ve done enough in my three books of memoirs?” It took … | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 7 months ago

Auden’s Grumpy Moon Landing Poem

“The moon is a desert. I have seen deserts,” Auden was fond of quipping. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 7 months ago

Lewis Lapham, the Art of Editing No. 4

Photo by Matthew Septimus, courtesy of Harper's Magazine.It is dangerous to excel at two different things. You run the risk of being underappreciated in one or the other; think of Michelangelo as a poet, of Michael Jordan as a baseball player. This is a trap that Lewis Lapham has … | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 7 months ago

For Whom Is the Water Park Fun?

Barett Swanson on the sheer insanity of a Noah’s Ark–themed water park in the age of the Anthropecene. | Continue reading


@theparisreview.org | 7 months ago