Mothers' paid work suffers during pandemic, study finds

When COVID-19 forced schools and daycares to shut down and millions of Americans to transition to working from home, some suggested the pandemic might equalize certain aspects of gender equality as men increased their household contributions. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 6 hours ago

Genetic differences between global American Crocodile populations identified in DNA analysis

A genetic analysis of the American crocodile (Crocodylus acutus) has re-established our understanding of its population structure, aiding its conservation. The collaborative study spanning seven countries and led by the Wildlife Conservation Society and University of Bristol rese … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 6 hours ago

Did ancient Americans settle in Polynesia? The evidence doesn't stack up

How did the Polynesian peoples come to live on the far-flung islands of the Pacific? The question has intrigued researchers for centuries. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 6 hours ago

Did ancient Americans settle in Polynesia? The evidence doesn't stack up

How did the Polynesian peoples come to live on the far-flung islands of the Pacific? The question has intrigued researchers for centuries. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 6 hours ago

The UAE's Mars mission seeks to bring Hope to more places than the red planet

On July 14, a new Mars-bound spacecraft will launch from Japan. While several Mars missions are planned to launch over the next month, what makes this different is who's launching it: the United Arab Emirates. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 6 hours ago

Acid rain and mercury legacy decreases the number of loon chicks in Ontario lakes

Gathered around a crackling campfire, a flat calm on the lake, the sunset's brilliant orange reflecting off the water, you hear a haunting cry echo through the trees. It's the call of the common loon, a sound synonymous with the boreal wild. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 6 hours ago

Niger Delta: young men face exclusion and violence in one of the most polluted places on Earth

After nearly seven decades of oil exploration in the Niger Delta, the Nigerian oil industry now makes up 65% of government revenue and 88% of foreign exchange earnings. But this oil wealth has come at a terrible cost to the local people and their environment. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 6 hours ago

Death by irony: The mystery of the mouse that died of smoke inhalation, but went nowhere near a fire

I looked through the microscope at the insides of a dead smoky mouse, and could barely believe my eyes. Thousands of tiny smoke particles lined its lungs. But the mouse had been kept more than 50 kilometers from the nearest bushfires. How could this be? | Continue reading


@phys.org | 6 hours ago

This plucky little fish survived Black Summer, but there's worse to come

On a coastal holiday last summer, I was preoccupied. Bushfires were tearing through southeast Australia, and one in particular had me worried. Online maps showed it moving towards the last remaining population of a plucky little fish, the stocky galaxias. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 6 hours ago

A few months ago, science gave this rare lizard a name, and it may already be headed for extinction

Bushfires are a threat to most animal species. But for one rare lizard living on a rocky island in the sky, a single blaze could wipe the species off the planet. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 6 hours ago

Air remains cleaner as post-lockdown traffic returns to normal, new research suggests

Air pollution is lower than expected in some of the UK's towns and cities, despite a return to almost normal traffic levels, new research shows. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 6 hours ago

5 ways higher education can be seen as hostile to women of color

In 2019, Amy Bonomi, a women's studies scholar, co-edited "Women Leading Change: Breaking the Glass Ceiling, Cliff, and Slipper." The book examines the perspectives of 23 female leaders on issues of leadership and the challenges of confronting structural racism, bias and discrimi … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 6 hours ago

How much fluorine is too much fluorine?

For most of us, our closest encounter with the element fluorine is likely to be our toothpaste or a municipal water supply with added fluoride. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 6 hours ago

Our helicopter rescue may seem a lot of effort for a plain little bird, but it was worth it

As we stepped out of a military helicopter on Victoria's east coast in February, smoke towered into the sky. We'd just flown over a blackened landscape extending as far as the eye could see. Now we were standing in an active fireground, and the stakes were high. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 6 hours ago

Emoji reveal whiteness as driver of technology

Even though they may seem benign ways to communicate emotions in text conversations, emoji reveal technology is shaped by cultural ideologies about race, according to research from the University of Alabama. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 7 hours ago

Detecting bird flu before it's ready to take off

Known as "bird flu," avian influenza is transmitted from wild ducks to chickens and other domestic birds. While the virus doesn't cause any symptoms in ducks, it's deadly for domestic birds and can decimate entire flocks. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 7 hours ago

Veterinarians play critical role in backyard poultry and livestock welfare, as well as human health

Backyard poultry and small-scale livestock agriculture are a growing trend in the U.S., even in large cities such as Seattle, Portland, Denver and San Francisco. Residents raising backyard poultry and livestock do so for a variety of reasons such as access to locally sourced food … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 7 hours ago

Design redundancy is in our DNA, and that affects genes' behavior

Design redundancy is not only an invention of engineers for building machines, but also a principle of nature for designing organisms. This principle is at play in the regulation of the genes responsible for directing stem cells to multiply themselves in the developing mouse embr … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 7 hours ago

Researchers find the worst reason to give a gift

Here's a good way to make sure a friend hates a gift from you: Say it will save him money. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 7 hours ago

Insights into climate change during origin of dinosaurs

The Triassic Period, about 252 to 201 million years ago, was a time of volatile change, particularly during an interval known as the Carnian (about 237 to 227 million years ago). Three dramatic events occurred on Earth: the first dinosaurs appeared, gigantic volcanic eruptions ca … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 7 hours ago

New models show how species will be relocated by climate change

Scientists at Duke University are harnessing the power of big data and geospatial analysis to create new ways to track the effects of climate change on species and food webs. Their work, which is funded by the National Science Foundation and NASA, began in 2018 and has already yi … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 7 hours ago

Why lava tubes should be our top exploration priority on other worlds

When magma comes out of the Earth onto the surface, it flows as lava. Those lava flows are fascinating to watch, and they leave behind some unique landforms and rocks. But a lot of what's fascinating about these flows can be hidden underground as lava tubes. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 7 hours ago

Who's your daddy? Male seahorses transport nutrients to embryos

New research by Dr. Camilla Whittington and her team at the University of Sydney has found male seahorses transport nutrients to their developing babies during pregnancy. This discovery provides an opportunity for further comparative evolutionary research. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 7 hours ago

Spinning chemicals for faster reactions

Cardiff University scientists have devised a new way of making reactions up to 70 times faster by using state-of-the-art equipment to spin chemicals around. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 7 hours ago

The Y chromosome is disappearing: What will happen to men?

The Y chromosome may be a symbol of masculinity, but it is becoming increasingly clear that it is anything but strong and enduring. Although it carries the "master switch" gene, SRY, that determines whether an embryo will develop as male (XY) or female (XX), it contains very few … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 7 hours ago

Astronomers map massive structure beyond Laniakea Supercluster

For the past decade, an international team of astronomers, led in part by Brent Tully at the University of Hawaiʻi Institute for Astronomy, has been mapping the distribution of galaxies around the Milky Way. They have discovered an immense structure beyond Laniakea, an immense su … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 7 hours ago

Leaving dogs in cars is dangerous all year round, even winter, study shows

People are being warned about the dangers of leaving their dogs in parked cars after a study found that internal temperatures were hot enough all year round to pose a risk to dog health. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 7 hours ago

Parker Solar Probe spies newly discovered comet NEOWISE

NASA's Parker Solar Probe was at the right place at the right time to capture a unique view of comet NEOWISE on July 5, 2020. Parker Solar Probe's position in space gave the spacecraft an unmatched view of the comet's twin tails when it was particularly active just after its clos … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 7 hours ago

Researchers find younger age for Earth's moon

The moon formed a little later than previously assumed. When a Mars-sized protoplanet was destroyed in a collision with the young Earth, a new body was created from the debris ejected during this collision, which became the moon. Planetary geophysicists at the German Aerospace Ce … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 7 hours ago

Robust high-performance data storage through magnetic anisotropy

The latest generation of magnetic hard drives is made of magnetic thin films, which are invar materials. They allow extremely robust and high data storage density by local heating of ultrasmall nano-domains with a laser—so called heat assisted magnetic recording, or HAMR. The vol … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 8 hours ago

Black phosphorus-based van der Waals heterostructures for mid-infrared light-emission applications

Researchers have realized optically and electrically driven mid-infrared (MIR) light-emitting devices in a simple but novel van der Waals (vdW) heterostructure constructed from thin-film black phosphorus (BP) and transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDC). This work suggests that vd … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 8 hours ago

Structure of the molecular cloud Orion A investigated in detail

Using a 3-D mapping technique, astronomers from Sweden and Germany have explored a nearby molecular cloud known as Orion A. The new study unveils more details about the structure and nature of this cloud. The research was presented in a paper published July 6 on the arXiv pre-pri … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 8 hours ago

Parasite infestations revealed by tiny chicken backpacks

Blood-feeding livestock mites can be detected with wearable sensor technology nicknamed "Fitbits for chickens." | Continue reading


@phys.org | 9 hours ago

Scientists demonstrate a new experiment in the search for theorized 'neutrinoless' proc

Nuclear physicists affiliated with the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) played a leading role in analyzing data for a demonstration experiment that has achieved record precision for a specialized detector material. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 13 hours ago

Study links attraction to 'tyrannical' leaders to dysfunctional family dynamics

Ever wonder how some leaders in business or politics who appear selfish, manipulative and domineering still manage to amass a following? A recent study in the Journal of Leadership & Organizational Studies by San Francisco State University Assistant Professor of Management Dayna … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 13 hours ago

Race to rescue turtles entangled in plastic on Bangladesh beach

At least 20 turtles were dead and dozens more were rescued Sunday after being entangled in plastic waste washed ashore on one of the world's longest beaches in Bangladesh, officials and conservationists said. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 1 day ago

SpaceX delays launch of mini-satellites

SpaceX on Saturday delayed the launch of a rocket due to take 57 mini-satellites into space as part of plan to build an orbiting, global broadband internet system. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 1 day ago

Nearly 300 wildfires in Siberia amid record warm weather

Russia's forest service said there were nearly 300 wildfires blazing across the vast country's northern wilderness on Saturday, as it attempted to contain them with methods including explosives and cloud seeding. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

The quest to find signs of ancient life on Mars

Mars may now be considered a barren, icy desert but did Earth's nearest neighbour once harbour life? | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Tiger, pangolin farming in Myanmar risks 'boosting demand'

Conservationists have warned a sudden change in Myanmar's law allowing the commercial farming of tigers, pangolins and other endangered species risks further fuelling demand in China for rare wildlife products. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Theft law needs reform to reduce the risk of judgements which lack 'common sense'

Theft law needs reform so the crime is based on consent not dishonesty—reducing the risk of judgements which lack "common sense"—a new study warns. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Liquid crystals create easy-to-read, color-changing sensors

Chameleons are famous for their color-changing abilities. Depending on their body temperature or mood, their nervous system directs skin tissue that contains nanocrystals to expand or contract, changing how the nanocrystals reflect light and turning the reptile's skin a rainbow o … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Two bizarre brown dwarfs found with citizen scientists' help

With the help of citizen scientists, astronomers have discovered two highly unusual brown dwarfs, balls of gas that are not massive enough to power themselves the way stars do. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Venice completes first test of all flood barriers

Venice's long awaited flood defence system designed to protect the lagoon city from damaging waters during high tides on Friday survived a first test of its 78 barriers. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Tropical Storm Fay shutters beaches as it heads north

Beaches closed in Delaware and shore town streets flooded in New Jersey as the fast-moving Tropical Storm Fay churned up the East Coast on a path expected to soak the New York City region. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

'Gun culture 3.0' is missing link to understand US gun culture

Leading firearm violence prevention researchers are first to use data to show differences in gun culture across the country, identifying gun cultures around recreation, self-defense, and politics. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Arctic Ocean changes driven by sub-Arctic seas

New research explores how lower-latitude oceans drive complex changes in the Arctic Ocean, pushing the region into a new reality distinct from the 20th-century norm. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

How Venus flytraps snap

Venus flytraps catch spiders and insects by snapping their trap leaves. This mechanism is activated when unsuspecting prey touch highly sensitive trigger hairs twice within 30 seconds. A study led by researchers at the University of Zurich has now shown that a single slow touch a … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 3 days ago