Schools love the idea of a growth mindset but does it work?

A generation of schoolchildren is being exhorted to believe in their brain’s elasticity. Does it really help them learn? | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 2 days ago

The trial

After the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001, the United States' departments of Defense and of Justice launched a series of unprecedented initiatives aimed at fighting terrorism, including US Constitution-bending rendition, torture and detainment programmes. Eighteen years la … | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 2 days ago

Chaucer was more than English: he was a great European poet

To call Chaucer the father of English literature sells him short. We should celebrate him as a great European poet | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 2 days ago

Lost in Migration: Walter Benjamin's Black Suitcase

When Walter Benjamin fled France in 1940, he took a heavy black suitcase. Did it contain a typescript? Where is it now? | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 2 days ago

Why Does Australia Have an Outsized Influence on Philosophy?

Despite its reputation as remote and anti-intellectual, Australia has exercised a surprisingly deep influence on philosophy | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 3 days ago

What are the values that drive decision making by AI?

Self-driving cars don’t drink and medical AIs are never overtired. Given our obvious flaws, what can humans still do best? | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 3 days ago

Poetry of perception: 'We Grow Accustomed to the Dark'

Written by Emily Dickinson during the depths of the US Civil War, the untitled poem known as ‘We Grow Accustomed to the Dark’ conjures hope and perseverance amid waves of chaos and uncertainty. In this animation, the UK filmmaker and illustrator Hannah Jacobs visualises the poem … | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 3 days ago

Moral technology

Self-driving cars don’t drink and medical AIs are never overtired. Given our obvious flaws, what can humans still do best? | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 3 days ago

The right to know, or not know, the data from medical research

The right to know and the right not to know: how national genetic sampling initiatives test the limits of nondisclosure | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 4 days ago

Lost in migration

When Walter Benjamin fled France in 1940, he took a heavy black suitcase. Did it contain a typescript? Where is it now? | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 4 days ago

It’s wrongheaded to protect nature with human-style rights

Should rivers have rights? Why the ‘human’ cannot continue to be the benchmark for the entitlements of other beings | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 5 days ago

Australian philosophy

Despite its reputation as remote and anti-intellectual, Australia has exercised a surprisingly deep influence on philosophy | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 5 days ago

How ISPs violate the laws of mathematics

This tongue-in-cheek animation from the US YouTuber Henry Reich – the mind behind MinutePhysics – is a creative exercise in how not to lose your cool when faced with the abyss of illogic. Recalling the mundane, mindnumbing tribulations of trying to get a straight answer on billin … | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 6 days ago

We aren’t really in control so why worry about neurointerventions?

The problem with neurointerventions is not the loss of control, since we’re not fully in control anyway | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 6 days ago

Queering Shakespeare

So many arguments are given against Shakespeare being gay – yet his sonnets contain their own message, that love is love | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 6 days ago

How hairworms highjack a cricket

Warning: this video is not for the squeamish.Mayflies make a quick and nutritious snack for crickets. But, rather unfortunately for the cricket population of California, some mayflies are home to hairworms (nematomorphs) – parasitic creatures that will stop at nothing to make the … | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 9 days ago

A constitution should help a country govern, not hobble it

How often to amend a constitution? India changes its constitution all the time, while the US has let its become a relic | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 9 days ago

Outside in Beijing

As preparations for the 2008 Summer Olympics were transforming swathes of Beijing, the Portuguese filmmaker Sérgio Cruz was exploring the city’s streets and public spaces with his camera. Taking an observational approach, Cruz found a metropolis undergoing rapid development, whil … | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 10 days ago

How the poor became blessed

Greco-Roman gods had no interest in the poor nor was organised charity a religious duty. How was Christianity different? | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 10 days ago

The Neanderthal renaissance

Handprints on a cave wall, crumbs from a meal: the new science of Neanderthals radically recasts the meaning of humanity | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 11 days ago

Like the chemical process of osmosis, migration is unstoppable

Migration is like the chemical process of osmosis: lesser flows towards greater. On the disruptive dynamics of inequality | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 11 days ago

Rediscovering Ancient Greek music

Much of what we think of as Ancient Greek poetry, including Homer’s Iliad and Odyssey, was composed to be sung, frequently with the accompaniment of musical instruments. And while the Greeks left modern classicists many indications that music was omnipresent in society – from vas … | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 12 days ago

Is bigger always better, or will the tiny inherit the Earth?

Animals inevitably grow in size over evolutionary time. But is bigger always better, or will the tiny inherit the Earth? | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 12 days ago

Here’s to naps and snoozes

American work culture, seeping around the globe, threatens to ruin the pleasures and benefits of public, communal sleep | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 12 days ago

The ghost in the machine

‘I fear being trapped in the statue of my own body, whilst my mind gazes out.’The 20th-century British philosopher Gilbert Ryle was a critic of ‘mind-body dualism’ – the idea first formulated by the 17th-century French philosopher René Descartes that there exists a clear distinct … | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 13 days ago

Opportunity costs: can carbon taxing become a positive-sum game?

Carbon emissions have opportunity costs that make climate change a market failure. Carbon taxing is a positive-sum solution | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 13 days ago

The growth mindset problem

A generation of schoolchildren is being exhorted to believe in their brain’s elasticity. Does it really help them learn? | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 13 days ago

Lost world

Singapore is a tiny country with outsized influence. The Southeast Asian island nation packs some 5.6 million people into just 278 square miles, making it the third most densely populated country in the world. Its wealth is mostly built on oil but, due to a growing population, a … | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 24 days ago

Nietzsche and the Cynics

How Friedrich Nietzsche used ideas from the Ancient Cynics to explore the death of God and the nature of morality | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 24 days ago

Imagine there’s no jealousy

Why we should understand jealousy as nothing more than a vice that ought to be replaced by the new virtue of compersion | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 25 days ago

How translation obscured the music and wordplay of the Bible

No translation of the Bible has tried to maintain both the meaning and the melody of the Hebrew scriptures – until now | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 25 days ago

Tusalava

The New Zealand-born artist Leonard Charles Huia Lye (1901-80), better known as Len Lye, is renowned for his work in kinetic sculpture and experimental film, and is widely considered one of the most innovative modernists of the 20th century. Lye's first film, Tusalava (1929), pro … | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 1 month ago

The future seems wide open with possibilities – but is it?

The future seems wide open with possibilities – but is it? What time travel can teach us about the malleability of the future | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 1 month ago

550 million years of human evolution

Via stints as reptiles, rodents and fish with feet, the evolution of humans is as meandering as it is extraordinary. Reminiscent of a similar sequence from Carl Sagan’s iconic TV series Cosmos (1980), this short animation traces human evolutionary history back 550 million years t … | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 1 month ago

Islam after Salman

The Satanic Verses would not be written or published today. What’s changed since Salman Rushdie’s notorious novel? | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 1 month ago

Speak to the shoemaker

Philosophy need not be arcane, argued Aristotle, as he led by example, writing treatises for peers and public alike | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 1 month ago

African art in Western museums: it's patrimony not heritage

Keeping African art in Western museums while deporting migrants from these countries is about patrimony, not heritage | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 1 month ago

20 Hz

Violent plasma explosions from the Sun’s surface – known as coronal mass ejections – reverberate to the farthest reaches of our solar system. However, due to the Earth’s protective magnetosphere, most people don’t take note of these events unless a particularly powerful solar fla … | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 1 month ago

How the body and mind talk to one another to understand the world

Interoception: the sense that monitors what is happening inside our own bodies | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 1 month ago

Misbehaving: being clever and wicked is a form of creativity

Would you steal a bunch of flowers from a graveside? The dark side of creativity means that you can be both clever and wicked | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 1 month ago

Can food nourish your soul? Communion bread

‘If you don’t believe in God, the life of a Carmelite nun is nonsense, and I was willing to take the chance.’The Order of the Brothers of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Mount Carmel, or simply Carmelites, is a Roman Catholic religious order that dates back to the 12th century. Founde … | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 1 month ago

Misbehaving: being clever and wicked is a form of creativity

Would you steal a bunch of flowers from a graveside? The dark side of creativity means that you can be both clever and wicked | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 1 month ago

The great disillusionist

In an age when so many people are at a loss to give life meaning and direction, Giacomo Leopardi is essential reading | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 1 month ago

Words as feelings

A special class of vivid, textural words defy linguistic theory: could ‘ideophones’ unlock the secrets of humans’ first utterances? | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 1 month ago

Portals

The Russian graphic illustrator and motion designer Vladimir Tomin is known for his web videos that deploy relatively simple video-editing tools to reality-warping effect. In his short Portals, views from a leafy autumn walk slowly break apart and shift back into focus, each time … | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 1 month ago

The why of reality

What makes a dinosaur real, but a unicorn unreal? Does philosophy even pretend to know how to answer a child’s questions? | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 1 month ago

In China and Japan, a copy is just as good as an original

In China and Japan, temples may be rebuilt and ancient warriors cast again. There is nothing sacred about the ‘original’ | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 1 month ago

Zhores Medvedev and the battle for truth in Soviet science

On Zhores Medvedev: The scientists the Soviet Union created became some of its most powerful and courageous critics | Continue reading


@aeon.co | 1 month ago