The Strange Appeal of Perverse Actions

Why do we enjoy doing things for no good reason? | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 1 day ago

Cyber Weapons Are Changing the Landscape of Warfare

Unlike conventional weapons, cyber weapons lend themselves to plausible deniability. How do you levy a threat when it’s not clear where an attack is coming from or who is responsible? | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 1 day ago

Andrew Yang’s Robot Apocalypse Can Heal a Divided Nation

The long-shot Presidential candidate is trying to tell a new story about mass unemployment. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 2 days ago

Teddy Roosevelt Would Not Understand the E.U.’S Antitrust Fine (2017)

In American antitrust law, the key concept is prices; in Europe’s more modern laws, it’s innovation. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 3 days ago

The Superhuman Controversy and the Shifting Ethics of Software

The e-mail startup isn’t the only company learning that a product can be powerful and elegant without being good. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 4 days ago

Mrs. Post Enlarges on Etiquette (1927)

Mrs. Post Enlarges on Etiquette | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 5 days ago

An Absurd Case of Mistaken Identity Draws to a Close

For three years, the central question of Italy’s highest-profile migration case has been whether prosecutors had the right man in custody. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 5 days ago

The Promise and Price of Cellular Therapies

New “living drugs”—made from a patient’s own cells—can cure once incurable cancers. But can we afford them? | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 5 days ago

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A group asked inmates to fill out a form describing a picture that they would like to receive. A volunteer would then create it. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 6 days ago

Libertarian Police Department (2014)

I was shooting heroin and reading “The Fountainhead” in the front seat of my privately owned police cruiser when a call came in. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 8 days ago

The Essay to Read If You Even Think About Wearing Clothes

Bernard Rudofsky’s 1947 essay “Are Clothes Modern?” ponders the passing of fads, the ideology of luxury goods, the changeability of body taboos, and the psychic satisfaction of a chic self-portrait. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 8 days ago

The Descendants of Slaves in Nigeria Fight for Equality

Slavery existed among the Igbo long before colonization, and accelerated with the transatlantic trade. Today, slave descendants still retain the stigma of their ancestors. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 8 days ago

The Case for Declaring a National Climate Emergency

A congressional resolution to declare a national emergency is symbolic for now, but it also reflects the reality of what’s needed, in the face of current facts, to combat climate change. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 8 days ago

The Messy Reality of Personalized Learning

Untangling the mixed record of the latest big-fix educational trend promoted by Silicon Valley. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 11 days ago

Kipling in America

What happened to the great defender of Empire when he settled in the States? | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 12 days ago

The Fight for the Future of YouTube

The video giant’s recent travails underscore a basic question: How “neutral” should social-media platforms try to be? | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 12 days ago

What If Life Did Not Originate on Earth?

Gary Ruvkun, a molecular biologist and professor of genetics at Harvard, wants to search for DNA on Mars. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 12 days ago

The U.S. Women’s Team Leaves the Stage as a New Kind of American Role Model

The members of the national team, beating the Netherlands on Sunday, have both inherited their claim to excellence and earned it, and they are unafraid to acknowledge their position. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 13 days ago

An earthquake will destroy a sizable portion of the coastal Northwest

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@newyorker.com | 13 days ago

The Uncanny Resurrection of Dungeons & Dragons

Dungeons & Dragons seems to have been waiting for us somewhere under the particular psyche of this generation. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 14 days ago

An Archaeological Space Oddity

The Egyptologist Sarah Parcak is using satellites to recruit amateur Indiana Joneses who can help locate ancient tombs before they’re lost forever. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 14 days ago

The Underworld of Online Content Moderation

The people tasked with cleaning up social-media platforms often work in secrecy, and many come away from the job disgusted with humanity. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 15 days ago

The Death of a Movie Theatre (2018)

When I heard about Lincoln Plaza Cinemas’ closing, I rushed to the theatre as often as I could, as though to visit a loved one in ill health. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 16 days ago

David Beats Goliath (2009)

When underdogs choose not to play by the rules, they can win, even when everything we think we know about power says they shouldn’t. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 17 days ago

Will California's New Bot Law Strengthen Democracy?

California is the first state to try to reduce the power of bots by requiring that they reveal their “artificial identity” when they are used to sell a product or influence a voter. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 17 days ago

For better and worse, we live in Jony Ive’s world

The ultimate consequence of Ive’s designs for Apple has been the slow ransacking of the physical world. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 17 days ago

The Lingering of Loss

My best friend left her laptop to me in her will. Twenty years later, I turned it on and began my inquest. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 18 days ago

Posters Became Art

It’s a story of the collective dreams that circulate in society, connecting the Lamborghini Countach to Paris in 1968. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 18 days ago

The New Yorker goes on the road with Mitski

The musician, who writes achingly intense songs about private yearnings, has spent the past year in performance venues packed with fellow-loners. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 19 days ago

Oregon's Tsunami Risk: Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea

Why are the state’s lawmakers encouraging development in its tsunami inundation zone? | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 19 days ago

Arthur Miller: Why I Wrote “The Crucible” (1996)

The playwright shares the story behind his drama about the Salem witch trials. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 20 days ago

How the Elderly Lose Their Rights (2017)

Guardians can sell the assets and control the lives of senior citizens without their consent—and reap a profit from it. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 22 days ago

Steve Jobs: “Technology Alone Is Not Enough”

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@newyorker.com | 22 days ago

Jonathan Ive and the Future of Apple (2015)

Inside the top-secret lab where the world’s most powerful design team created the Apple Watch. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 23 days ago

The Brooklyn Startup Helping High-School Athletes Go Viral

Overtime wants to be the dominant sports network for kids who grew up with iPhones in their pockets. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 25 days ago

A Raccoon Became an Aardvark (2014)

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@newyorker.com | 25 days ago

The Cost of GoFundMe Healthcare

When patients turn to crowdfunding for medical costs, whoever has the most heartrending story wins. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 25 days ago

Why Weather Forecasting Keeps Getting Better

The stakes can be so much higher than whether you’ll need an umbrella today. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 26 days ago

The Itch (2008)

What if you started itching—and couldn’t stop? | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 27 days ago

Inside the Cultish Dreamworld of Augusta National

The home of the Masters Tournament is a prelapsarian golf paradise, combining good manners and Southern delights with exclusion and self-satisfaction. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 27 days ago

Basta Bunga Bunga

America has the bombastic Donald Trump. For many years, Italy had the gleefully profane Silvio Berlusconi as its Prime Minister. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 27 days ago

The Polar Bear as Image of Climate Change

One image, of a starving polar bear in a town in Siberia, seemed to encapsulate the tragedy of climate change. But the story, it turned out, was incomplete. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 27 days ago

The White Darkneww – A Solitary Journey Across Antarctica

At fifty-five, Henry Worsley began a solitary trek that became a singular test of character. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 28 days ago

A Twenty-Four-Thousand-Mile Walk Across Human History

One journalist’s effort to retrace, on foot, the path blazed by Homo sapiens as they spread around the world—and to chronicle the perils they face today. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 29 days ago

The Newsstands of the Future Will Have No Newspapers

In thirty-nine locations, including aboard New York City’s ferries, New Stands offer an array of items, from tabletop herb gardens to vibrators, to amuse and titillate. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 29 days ago

The Durable Feeling That a Child Is Always at Risk

During times of medical crisis, the ways that doctors and nurses communicate with frightened parents can have lifelong effects on infants. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 1 month ago

The NRA’s Longtime CFO Was Caught Embezzling Before Joining the Org

In the course of several years as an executive at a consulting firm, Woody Phillips diverted more than a million dollars to his personal account by submitting fake vender invoices. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 1 month ago

Humanity’s Eternal Quest for a Better Way of Peeling Garlic

A new method, made viral this week thanks to a video posted on Twitter, showed a seemingly effortless stab-and-twist-and-pull technique. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 1 month ago