The Importance, and Incoherence, of Twitter’s Trump Ban

The horrific optics of January 6th shocked Twitter and other platforms into action. But any ban, no matter how prominent, is still a relatively superficial intervention, because it doesn’t change the platform’s underlying architecture. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 19 hours ago

A Man Who Invented the Drug Memoir (2016)

Thomas De Quincey’s intoxicating prose derived its power from the writer’s opium habit. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 1 day ago

Among the Insurrections

The Capitol was breached by Trump supporters who had been declaring, at rally after rally, that they would go to violent lengths to keep the President in power. A chronicle of an attack foretold. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 1 day ago

How to Think Through Finding a Lost Shoe (2018)

Has your husband recently “cleaned” the house? | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 2 days ago

What’s Wrong with the Way We Work

Americans are told to give their all—time, labor, and passion—to their jobs. But do their jobs give enough back? | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 3 days ago

The platforms have acted, raising hard questions about technology and democracy

The platforms have acted, raising hard questions about technology and democracy. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 3 days ago

El Anatsui Broke the Seal on Contemporary Art

His runaway success began with castaway junk: a bag of bottle caps along the road. Now the Ghanaian sculptor is redefining Africa’s place in the global art scene. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 4 days ago

Is It Too Late to Learn New Skills?

You missed your chance to be a prodigy, but there’s still growth left for grownups. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 5 days ago

Far too many Republicans are complicit in the President’s continuing efforts to overturn the election results. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 11 days ago

The Crypto-Currency

Bitcoin and its mysterious inventor. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 12 days ago

The Myth of the Megalith (2014)

Archaeologists in Baalbek, Lebanon, recently discovered a three-million-pound foundation stone. On whose orders was it cut, and why was it abandoned? | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 12 days ago

The Escape Artist: The death and life of Stefan Zweig (2012)

The death and life of Stefan Zweig. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 14 days ago

Arthur Jafa’s Radical Alienation

The filmmaker left an art world he found too white; years later, he made a triumphant return with “Love Is the Message, the Message Is Death.” | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 14 days ago

A Few Too Many

From 2008: Joan Acocella on the anatomy of a hangover, and its worldwide legion of folk cures. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 14 days ago

Three Mathematicians We Lost in 2020

John Conway, Ronald Graham, and Freeman Dyson all explored the world with their minds. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 15 days ago

Doubting Thomas

Thomas Browne was born in 1605, the year that Francis Bacon published one of the seminal tracts of the Scientific Revolution, Cervantes published the first… | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 16 days ago

Does “Wonder Woman 1984” Hide Its Hero’s True Superpowers?

The new film about a female icon ignores her history as a female rebel. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 16 days ago

Can Charlie Kaufman Get Out of His Head?

Kaufman became famous writing self-conscious films in a self-conscious time. In his début novel, he reminds us of the triumphs—and blind spots—of a generation. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 16 days ago

What Thomas Jefferson Could Never Understand About Jesus

Jefferson revised the Gospels to make Jesus more reasonable, and lost the power of his story. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 18 days ago

Is Substack the Media Future We Want?

The newsletter service is a software company that, by mimicking some of the functions of newsrooms, has made itself difficult to categorize. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 18 days ago

Master of Play – The many worlds of a video-game artist (2010)

How Shigeru Miyamoto captured the essence of play and redefined entertainment. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 19 days ago

The Plague Year

The mistakes and the struggles behind America’s coronavirus tragedy. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 19 days ago

The Plague Year

The mistakes and the struggles behind America’s coronavirus tragedy. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 19 days ago

Cheever's Art of the Devastating Phrase

Had he lived, John Cheever would have turned a hundred this week. A lifelong admirer of his work, I find myself again returning to one of my least favorite… | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 21 days ago

The Chaos of the Dice: A backgammon hustler’s quest to gain an edge (2013)

Falafel (his real name is Matvey Natanzon, but no one calls him that, not even his mother) can make ten thousand dollars in half an hour playing backgammon; he can make many times that in an evening—and he can lose it all just as easily. Backgammon is his main source of income—to … | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 21 days ago

The Year of Unchecked Privilege-Checking

The events of 2020 created a compulsion to confess one’s advantages, even in the midst of enjoying them. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 22 days ago

The Coach in the Operating Room (2011)

Outside ears, and eyes, are important for concert-calibre musicians and Olympic-level athletes. What about regular professionals? | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 24 days ago

A tycoon's deep state conspiracy dive

Patrick Byrne, the former head of Overstock, had always been outspoken. Did an affair with a Russian agent push him too far? | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 26 days ago

Shigeru Miyamoto Wants to Create a Kinder World

The legendary designer on rejecting violence in games, trying to be a good boss, and building Nintendo’s Disneyland. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 27 days ago

John Le Carré Missed Nothing

He was a gentleman and a spy, though he would have stoutly denied that the two could coexist. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 27 days ago

The Photographer Who Set Out to Watch Herself Age

Nancy Floyd began taking a self-portrait each morning in 1982 and sustained the practice on and off for nearly four decades. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 29 days ago

Getting Vaccinated Will (and Won’t) Change My Behavior

The shot will make me less worried about getting the virus—but I’ll still fear passing it on to others. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 29 days ago

I Met My Wife (1994)

SHOUTS AND MURMURS about man who describes meeting his wife at a party. In his description, he drops many prefixes. It had been a rough day, so when I … | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 1 month ago

As the pandemic set in, the shows that stood out to me most were those that transported me—especially when they made me laugh. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 1 month ago

Is Heidegger Contaminated by Nazism? (2014)

It’s impossible to disavow Heidegger’s useful and influential thinking, but it’s also impossible to set aside his sins. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 1 month ago

The Answer Man: An ancient poem was rediscovered–and the world swerved (2011)

An ancient poem was rediscovered—and the world swerved. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 1 month ago

The Aquarium: A child’s isolating illness (2011)

“One of the most common platitudes we heard was that ‘words failed.’ But words were not failing Teri and me at all.” | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 1 month ago

What If You Could Do It All Over?

The uncanny allure of our unlived lives. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 1 month ago

Why New York’s Mob Mythology Endures

We hang on to legends of the Mafia’s inner workings as parables for the wider world. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 1 month ago

Slack is the right tool for the wrong way to work

If Slack, which improves a fundamentally flawed approach to collaboration, is worth tens of billions of dollars, imagine the value in fixing the underlying problems. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 1 month ago

Japan's Rent-a-Family Industry

People who are short on relatives can hire a husband, a mother, a grandson. The resulting relationships can be more real than you’d expect. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 1 month ago

My Life in Cars

I lucked into the romance of driving at its fervent peak. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 1 month ago

What an FDA Committee Weighed in Voting for the Pfizer Covid Vaccine

In the present circumstances, one could imagine a far more fraught F.D.A. hearing than the one that took place on Thursday. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 1 month ago

Dianne Feinstein's Missteps Raise a Painful Age Question Among Senate Democrats

Older lawmakers’ foibles and infirmities are coming under new scrutiny, violating an unspoken culture of complicity and coverup. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 1 month ago

Cream

“ ‘There’s nothing worth getting in this world that you can get easily,’ the old man had said, with unshakable conviction, like Pythagoras explaining his theorem.” | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 1 month ago

T. S. Eliot’s Muse

For years, Emily Hale was the object of his longing and the source of his inspiration. Was the loss of their romance a boon for his poetry? | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 1 month ago

The Skeletons at the Lake

Genetic analysis of human remains found in the Himalayas has raised baffling questions about who these people were and why they were there. | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 1 month ago

Patrick Byrne – A Tycoon’s Deep-State Conspiracy Dive

Patrick Byrne, of Overstock, had always been outspoken. Did an affair with a Russian agent push him too far? | Continue reading


@newyorker.com | 1 month ago