Extensive flooding in eastern Canada forces evacuations

Flooding in eastern Canada forced the evacuation of 1,200 people while more than 600 troops have been deployed in response, authorities said Sunday. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 3 hours ago

Incident on SpaceX pad could delay its first manned flight

A mysterious but apparently serious incident occurred Saturday in Cape Canaveral, Florida involving the SpaceX capsule intended to carry American astronauts into space late this year, the private company and NASA announced. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 3 hours ago

The ethical gold rush: Gilded age for guilt-free jewellery

Forget how many carats—how ethical is your gold? As high-end consumers demand to know the origin of their treasures, some jewellers are ensuring they use responsibly sourced, eco-friendly or recycled gold. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 17 hours ago

Australia orders urgent review after spate of dingo attacks

Australia on Sunday ordered a urgent review into the management of dingoes on a popular tourist island after a spate of attacks by the wild dogs this year. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 17 hours ago

Doctor-services firm says private data of patients exposed

Nationwide physician-staffing company EmCare says a breach exposed personal data for about 31,000 patients, including in some cases their Social Security numbers and clinical information. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 17 hours ago

Tesla wants to cut size of board from 11 directors to 7

Tesla plans to cut its board of directors from 11 to seven in a move the electric-car maker says will allow the board to act more nimbly and efficiently. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 1 day ago

Costa Rica bets on ending fossil fuel use by 2050

Eric Orlich and his wife Gioconda Rojas own two electric vehicles, which they charge at home in the garage thanks to solar panels on their roof. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 1 day ago

Panel to review approval of Boeing 737 Max flight controls

A global team of experts next week will begin reviewing how the Boeing 737 Max's flight control system was approved by the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 1 day ago

Ransomware 'hero' pleads guilty to US hacking charges

A British computer security researcher once hailed as a "hero" for helping stem a ransomware outbreak and later accused of creating malware to attack the banking system said Friday he pleaded guilty to US criminal charges. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 1 day ago

Report: FTC considering oversight of Facebook's Zuckerberg

Federal regulators are reportedly considering seeking some kind of oversight of Mark Zuckerberg's leadership of Facebook over the social network giant's mishandling of users' personal information. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Honda slows Accord, Civic production as buyers shift to SUVs

Honda is slowing production of Accord and Civic cars as U.S. buyers continue to favor SUVs and trucks. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

A universal framework combining genome annotation and undergraduate education

As genome sequencing becomes cheaper and faster, resulting in an exponential increase in data, the need for efficiency in predicting gene function is growing, as is the need to train the next generation of scientists in bioinformatics. Researchers in the lab of Lukas Mueller, a f … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Study shows continuing impacts of Deepwater Horizon oil spill

Nine years ago tomorrow—April 20, 2010—crude oil began leaking from the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig into the Gulf of Mexico in what turned out to be the largest marine oil spill in history. A long-term study suggests the oil is still affecting the salt marshes of the Gulf Coas … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Thermodynamic magic enables cooling without energy consumption

Physicists at the University of Zurich have developed an amazingly simple device that allows heat to flow temporarily from a cold to a warm object without an external power supply. Intriguingly, the process initially appears to contradict the fundamental laws of physics. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

How NASA Earth data aids America, state by state

For six decades, NASA has used the vantage point of space to better understand our home planet and improve lives. A new interactive website called Space for U.S. highlights some of the many ways that NASA's Earth observations help people strengthen communities across the United S … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Researchers report high performance solid-state sodium-ion battery

Solid-state sodium-ion batteries are far safer than conventional lithium-ion batteries, which pose a risk of fire and explosions, but their performance has been too weak to offset the safety advantages. Researchers Friday reported developing an organic cathode that dramatically i … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Hurricane Michael gets an upgrade to rare Category 5 status

Hurricane Michael, which devastated the Florida Panhandle last fall, was actually stronger than initially measured, prompting forecasters to posthumously upgrade it from a Category 4 storm to a Category 5, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Friday. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

New method to detect off-target effects of CRISPR

Since the CRISPR genome editing technology was invented in 2012, it has shown great promise to treat a number of intractable diseases. However, scientists have struggled to identify potential off-target effects in therapeutically relevant cell types, which remains the main barrie … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Scientists uncover a link between RNA editing and chloroplast-to-nucleus communication

What will a three-degree-warmer world look like? How will plants fare in more extreme weather conditions? When experiencing stress or damage from various sources, plants use chloroplast-to-nucleus communication to regulate gene expression and help them cope. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

The role of digital technologies in mobilizing the alt-right

In "Misogynistic Men Online: How the Red Pill Helped Elect Trump," published in Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, Pierce Alexander Dignam and Deana A. Rohlinger examine the transformation of online alt-right forums from marginal spaces of misogynistic collective ide … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Mesopotamian King Sargon II envisioned ancient city Karkemish as western Assyrian capital

In "A New Historical Inscription of Sargon II from Karkemish," published in the Journal of Near Eastern Studies, Gianni Marchesi translates a recently discovered inscription of the Assyrian King Sargon II found at the ruins of the ancient city of Karkemish. The inscription, which … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Salt takes a quick step before falling out of water

When a drop of sea spray lands on a rock and heats under the midday sun, the salt crystalizes and falls out of the evaporating water as a crystal—helping to power the Earth's atmosphere and leaving a delicious kernel of spice for dinner. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Creating a cloak for grid data in the cloud

Delivering modern electricity is a numbers game. From power plant output to consumer usage patterns, grid operators juggle a complex set of variables to keep the lights on. Cloud-based tools can help manage all of these data, but utility owners and system operators are concerned … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Through thick and thin: Neutrons track lithium ions in battery electrodes

Lithium-ion batteries are expected to have a global market value of $47 billion by 2023. They are used in numerous applications, because they offer relatively high energy density (storage capacity), high operating voltage, long shelf life and little "memory effect"—a reduction in … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Bringing the border closer to home, one immersion trip at a time

Many if not most Americans have never crossed the U.S. border with Mexico by land or spent any time in that region. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

War games shed light on real-world strategies

Want to try your hand at negotiating during a crisis? Think you have a plan that could get the U.S. out of Afghanistan? Confident you could keep a nation secure when multi-party international diplomacy is more important than warfare? Strategy-based board games let you test your p … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Why mass shootings don't lead to gun control

Mass shootings happen with numbing frequency in the United States. Despite the extraordinary tragedy of these events, such as the shooting at Columbine High School twenty years ago this week, little progress has been made in policy and law to prevent them from happening again. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Successful tests of a cooler way to transport electricity

Like a metal python, the huge pipe snaking through a CERN high-tech hall is actually a new electrical transmission line. This superconducting line is the first of its kind and allows vast quantities of electrical current to be transported within a pipe of a relatively small diame … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Daily grind: The biography of a stone axe

Tom Breukel analysed some 250 stone axes from the Caribbean and reconstructed their biographies, thus increasing our knowledge of production and trade in the period around the arrival of Columbus. His Ph.D. defence is on 18 April. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Researchers find adding rare-earth element to piezoelectric crystals dramatically improves performance

A team of researchers from China, the U.S. and Australia has found that adding the rare-earth element samarium to piezoelectric crystals can dramatically improve their performance. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their work and how well the al … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Tiny pinholes in thin film could pave the way for 3-D holographic displays

Researchers in Korea have designed an ultrathin display that can project dynamic, multi-colored, 3-D holographic images, according to a study published in Nature Communications. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Scientists discover sustainable way to increase seed oil yield in crops

Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) scientists have developed a sustainable way to demonstrate a new genetic modification that can increase the yield of natural oil in seeds by up to 15 per cent in laboratory conditions. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

On-chip drug screening for identifying antibiotic interactions in eight hours

A KAIST research team developed a microfluidic-based drug screening chip that identifies synergistic interactions between two antibiotics in eight hours. This chip can be a cell-based drug screening platform for exploring critical pharmacological patterns of antibiotic interactio … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Fuel cells in bacteria

The exchange of nitrogen between the atmosphere and organic matter is crucial for life on Earth because nitrogen is a major component of essential molecules such as proteins and DNA. One major route for this exchange, discovered only in the 1990s, is the anammox pathway found in … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

When coastal hazards threaten your Outer Banks trip

A trip to the Outer Banks is a tradition for some North Carolina families and a bucket-list destination for other tourists. A new study from North Carolina State University asked visitors for their reactions to having travel plans disrupted by coastal hazards like washed-out road … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

MicroRNA-like RNAs contribute to the lifestyle transition of Arthrobotrys oligospora

Lifestyle transition is a fundamental mechanism that fungi have evolved to survive and proliferate in different environments. As a typical nematode-trapping fungus, Arthrobotrys oligospora switches from saprophytes to predators on induction of nematode prey. During its induced li … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

From nata de coco to computer screens: Cellulose gets a chance to shine

A team at the Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research at Osaka University has determined the optical parameters of cellulose molecules with unprecedented precision. They found that cellulose's intrinsic birefringence, which describes how a material reacts differently to l … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Taming the genome's 'jumping' sequences

The human genome is fascinating. Once predicted to contain about a hundred thousand protein-coding genes, it now seems that the number is closer to twenty thousand, and maybe less. And although our genome is made up of about three billion units—base pairs—many of them don't seem … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

BRB-seq: The quick and cheaper future of RNA sequencing

RNA sequencing is a technique used to analyze entire genomes by looking at the expression of their genes. Today, such genome-wide expression analyses are a standard tool for genomic studies because they rely on high-throughput technologies, which themselves have become widely ava … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Multiple modes for selectivity of transmembrane transport

LMU researchers utilized a biophysical approach to understand how bacterial import proteins bind and selectively convey their cargoes across membranes. The results reveal an unexpectedly wide variety of transfer mechanisms. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

American astronaut's dreams of seeing space becoming reality

A Mainer who's headed to the International Space Station says she's always dreamed of being in space and "seeing this giant blue ball below me." | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Private cargo ship brings Easter feast to the space station

A private cargo ship brought food galore to the International Space Station on Friday. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Mysterious river dolphin helps crack the code of marine mammal communication

The Araguaian river dolphin of Brazil is something of a mystery. It was thought to be quite solitary, with little social structure that would require communication. But Laura May Collado, a biologist at the University of Vermont, and her colleagues have discovered that the dolphi … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Cities and countries aim to slash plastic waste within a decade

If all goes well, 2030 will be quite a special year. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Usurp the burp: How seaweed can help curb cow burps (and their emissions)

Agricultural and marine scientists at the University of California have joined forces to combat one of the greatest sources of methane emissions in California: cow burps. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Weapons trade reveals a darker side to dark web

Debates over gun regulations make headlines across the world, but there's an underground operation for weapons that has drawn very little attention – until now. Researchers from Michigan State University crept into the dark web to investigate how firearms are anonymously bought a … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

An exotic microbe and an unusual extraction process may add up to an economical way to make a promising biofuel

Taking a step closer to a "green" replacement for fossil fuels, a research team that includes a chemical engineer at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a novel process using an unusual solvent and an exotic microorganism that may make it possible to manufacture i … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago

Opinion: Canada's approach to lunar exploration needs to be strategic or we'll be left behind

Should Canada go to the moon? What's there for Canadians? It is these questions that we should ponder when Prime Minister Justin Trudeau recently announced that Canada will be participating in the new space exploration vision. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 days ago