5,000 years of history of domestic cats in Central Europe

A loner and a hunter with highly developed territorial instincts, a cruel carnivore, a disobedient individual: the cat. These features make the species averse to domestication. Even so, we did it. Nowadays, about 500 million cats live in households all around the world; it is als … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 1 hour ago

Consumer-created social media visuals capture consumer brand perceptions

New research has found that there is a strong link between the visual portrayal of a brand in online imagery created by consumers and the larger brand perceptions. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 1 hour ago

Chance of big San Andreas earthquake increased by Ridgecrest temblors, study suggests

A new study suggests that last year's Ridgecrest earthquakes increased the chance of a large earthquake on California's San Andreas fault. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 1 hour ago

Astrophysicists suggest carbon found in comet ATLAS help reveal age of other comets

Astrophysicists from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU, Russia), South Korea, and the U.S. appear in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, suggesting carbon indicates time comets have spent in the Solar System—the less carbon, the longer they have been in the prox … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 1 hour ago

Listeria protein provides a CRISPR 'kill switch'

A single protein derived from a common strain of bacteria found in the soil will offer scientists a more precise way to edit RNA. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 1 hour ago

Bird droppings carry risk of antibiotic resistance

Bird poop may pose more health risks than people realize, according to Rice University environmental engineers who study antibiotic resistance. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 1 hour ago

Researchers develop new technique for production of plasmonics devices

Research laboratories are constantly developing new materials that are expected to exhibit novel properties bound to revolutionize this or that technology. But it's not enough to simply create these materials; scientists also need to find efficient methods of processing and fine- … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 1 hour ago

New solar material could clean drinking water

Providing clean water to soldiers in the field and citizens around the world is essential, and yet one of the world's greatest challenges. Now a new super-wicking and super-light-absorbing aluminum material developed with Army funding could change that. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 1 hour ago

Echolocation is costly for small bats when they're calling loudly

Calling in the ultrasonic range enables small bats to orient themselves in the dark and track down tiny insects. Louder calls travel farther, improving a bat's ability to detect their prey. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 1 hour ago

Researchers uncover molecular architecture of natural photosynthetic machinery

Biological membranes play important roles in shaping the cell, sensing the external environment, molecule transport, and generating energy for life. One of the most significant biological membranes are the thylakoid membranes produced in plants, algae and cyanobacteria, which car … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 1 hour ago

Look out, Mars: Here we come with a fleet of spacecraft

Mars is about to be invaded by planet Earth—big time. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 hours ago

Germany aims to make its EU presidency 'climate neutral'

German is aiming to make its six-month presidency of the European Union "climate neutral," by organizing events in such a way as to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and offsetting any that can't be avoided, officials said Monday. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 hours ago

Bad weather may delay 1st UAE Mars mission on Japan rocket

Final preparations for the launch from Japan of the United Arab Emirates' first Mars mission were underway Monday, but there was a chance of a delay because of bad weather, a Japanese rocket provider said. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 hours ago

Kenya wildlife reserves threatened as tourists stay away

In the majestic plains of the Maasai Mara, the coronavirus pandemic spells economic disaster for locals who earn a living from tourists coming to see Kenya's abundant wildlife. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 hours ago

Chinese rivers and lakes swell perilously as summer flood season crests

Floods across central and eastern China have left more than 140 people dead or missing and are swelling major rivers and lakes to record-high levels, with authorities warning that the worst was yet to come. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 hours ago

Coronavirus masks, gloves polluting Europe's rivers

Europe's major rivers are littered with surgical masks and medical gloves discarded by people protecting themselves against coronavirus, scientists have reported. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 2 hours ago

Turning off 'junk DNA' may free stem cells to become neurons

For every cell in the body there comes a time when it must decide what it wants to do for the rest of its life. In an article published in the journal PNAS, NIH researchers report for the first time that ancient viral genes that were once considered "junk DNA" may play a role in … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 3 hours ago

Artificial intelligence predicts which planetary systems will survive

Why don't planets collide more often? How do planetary systems—like our solar system or multi-planet systems around other stars—organize themselves? Of all of the possible ways planets could orbit, how many configurations will remain stable over the billions of years of a star's … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 3 hours ago

We need to talk: Communication prevents inaction by leveraging goodwill

A large-scale, multi-institutional study designed to examine human behavior has shown that communication helps groups of strangers to focus on resolving common problems and provides new and surprising insights into what goes on when negotiation talks fail or succeed. The findings … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 3 hours ago

Power of DNA to store information gets an upgrade

A team of interdisciplinary researchers has discovered a new technique to store in DNA information—in this case "The Wizard of Oz," translated into Esperanto—with unprecedented accuracy and efficiency. The technique harnesses the information-storage capacity of intertwined strand … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 3 hours ago

Human sperm stem cells grown in lab, an early step toward infertility treatment

Infertility affects one in seven men of reproductive age worldwide. One idea for treating male sterility is spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) therapy. In this approach, sperm stem cells in the testis are transferred to a test tube, cultured and nudged into becoming fully fledged spe … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 3 hours ago

New models detail how major rivers will respond to changing environmental conditions

From the Nile to the Mississippi and from the Amazon to the Yangzi, human civilization is inextricably linked to the great rivers along which our societies developed. But rivers are mutable, and the benefits they bestow can quickly become disasters when these waterways change cou … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 3 hours ago

Deadly under-the-radar heatwaves ravaging Africa

The impacts of extreme heatwaves amplified by climate change are going unrecorded in sub-Saharan Africa, making it nearly impossible to detect patterns and set up early warning systems, researchers said Monday. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 3 hours ago

Examine narratives to end policy deadlock, boost agricultural development in Africa, economists say

The COVID-19 pandemic presents an opportunity to transform food systems and achieve sustainable development. But the lively policy debate on which policy approach will promote agricultural development in Africa still prevents progress. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 4 hours ago

Antibiotic resistance and the need for personalized treatments

Antibiotic resistance is a growing challenge in the treatment of infectious diseases worldwide. Bacteria become resistant to antibiotics by acquiring or mutating genes that allow them to survive the administration of antibiotics, which otherwise would kill them. However, this adv … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 4 hours ago

Climate change will cause more extreme wet and dry seasons, researchers find

The world can expect more rainfall as the climate changes, but it can also expect more water to evaporate, complicating efforts to manage reservoirs and irrigate crops in a growing world, according to a Clemson University researcher whose latest work has been published in the jou … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 4 hours ago

Earth-shaking science in the freezer: Next generation vibration sensors at cryogenic temperatures

A cutting-edge vibration sensor may improve the next generation of gravitational-wave detectors to find the tiniest cosmic waves from the background hum of Earth's motion. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 4 hours ago

Scientists have discovered a new physical paradox

Researchers from the Peter the Great St.Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) have discovered and theoretically explained a new physical effect: amplitude of mechanical vibrations can grow without external influence. The scientific group offered their explanation on how to el … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 4 hours ago

The colorful history of plastids

A billion years ago, a single-celled eukaryote engulfed a cyanobacterium—an organism capable of converting the sun's energy into food in the form of carbohydrates. In one of the single most pivotal events in the history of life, instead of the bacterium being digested, an endosym … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 hours ago

About nine family members to suffer grief from every COVID-19 fatality

Deaths from COVID-19 will have a ripple effect causing impacts on the mental health and health of surviving family members. But the extent of that impact has been hard to assess until now. Every death from COVID-19 will impact approximately nine surviving family members, accordin … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 hours ago

Chicago air is dirtier this July than smog-choked Los Angeles

After missing out on cleaner air during the coronavirus lockdown, the Chicago area just suffered its longest streak of high-pollution days in more than a decade. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 hours ago

Most 50+ adults say they've experienced ageism, most still hold positive aging attitudes

An offhand remark by an acquaintance about using a smartphone. A joke about someone losing their memory or hearing. An ad in a magazine focused on erasing wrinkles or gray hair. An inner worry that getting older means growing lonely. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 hours ago

COVID-19 and Brexit can help with the recovery of UK fish stocks

The United Kingdom has a unique opportunity to start rebuilding its fish stocks by taking advantage of the slowdown in commercial fishing caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and ongoing Brexit negotiations, new research has shown. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 hours ago

Simultaneous, reinforcing policy failures led to Flint water crisis, providing lessons during pandemic

Concurrent failures of federal drinking water standards and Michigan's emergency manager law reinforced and magnified each other, leading to the Flint water crisis, according to a University of Michigan environmental policy expert. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 hours ago

New substance library to accelerate the search for active compounds

In order to accelerate the systematic development of drugs, the MX team at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the Drug Design Group at the University of Marburg have established a new substance library. It consists of 1103 organic molecules that could be used as building bloc … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 hours ago

A micro-lab on a chip detects blood type within minutes

Blood transfusion, if performed promptly, is a potentially life-saving intervention for someone losing a lot of blood. However, blood comes in several types, some of which are incompatible with others. Transfusing an incompatible blood type can severely harm a patient. It is, the … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 hours ago

Research: Crop plants are taking up microplastics

Microplastics (MPs), i.e., tiny plastic particles less than 5 millimeters in length, can now be found throughout the ocean and other aquatic ecosystems, and even in our seafood and salt. As MPs have become ubiquitous, scientists have become concerned about the transfer of MPs fro … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 hours ago

About eight percent of red giants are covered by sunspot-like dark areas.

Starspots are more common among red giant stars than previously thought. In the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics, researchers led by the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (MPS) in Germany report that approximately eight percent of red giants exhibit such spots. They … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 hours ago

Electron cryo-microscopy: Using inexpensive technology to produce high-resolution images

Biochemists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have used a standard electron cryo-microscope to achieve surprisingly good images that are on par with those taken by far more sophisticated equipment. They have succeeded in determining the structure of ferritin almo … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 6 hours ago

Biosignatures may reveal a wealth of new data locked inside old fossils

Step aside, skeletons—a new world of biochemical 'signatures' found in all kinds of ancient fossils is revealing itself to paleontologists, providing a new avenue for insights into major evolutionary questions. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 6 hours ago

Using math formulas to predict earthquakes

A team of researchers at Lyell Centre in Edinburgh, has developed a way to use math formulas to help predict when an earthquake is likely to happen. In their paper published in Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, the group describes translating the movement of a particu … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 6 hours ago

Long-term heat-storage ceramics absorbing thermal energy from hot water

Approximately seventy percent of the thermal energy generated in thermal and nuclear power plants is lost as waste heat, with a temperature below the boiling point of water. In a recent report on Science Advances, Yoshitaka Nakamura and a research team in chemistry, materials, an … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 6 hours ago

Black women often ignored by social justice movements

Black women are often less likely to be associated with the concept of a "typical woman" and are viewed as more similar to Black men than to white women, which may lead to some anti-racist and feminist movements failing to advocate for the rights of Black women, according to new … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 6 hours ago

Crop infesting spores 'tricked' by new biomaterials to aid global wheat production

New man-made materials developed by scientists have been successfully used to confuse and trick harmful spores which attack wheat crops into growing on an alternative host to help farmers protect their food production. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 6 hours ago

New bioink for cell bioprinting in 3-D

A research group led by Daniel Aili, associate professor at Linköping University, has developed a bioink to print tissue-mimicking material in 3-D printers. The scientists have developed a method and a material that allow cells to survive and thrive. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 6 hours ago

Local changes in species diversity in Europe

Together with an international team, Senckenberg researchers published the results of a unique compilation of 161 biodiversity time series (over 15 to 91 years) covering 6,200 marine, terrestrial, and freshwater species from 21 European countries. The scientists were able to show … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 6 hours ago

New technique to study superheavy elements

Superheavy elements are intriguing nuclear and atomic quantum systems that challenge experimental probing as they do not occur in nature and, when synthesized, vanish within seconds. Pushing the forefront of atomic physics research to these elements requires breakthrough developm … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 6 hours ago

Hidden in our genes: Discovering the fate of cell development

As cells develop, changes in how our genes interact determines their fate. Differences in these genetic interactions can make our cells robust to infection from viruses or make it possible for our immune cells to kill cancerous ones. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 7 hours ago