Egyptian Vats 5,600 Years Old Were For Beer Brewing

Archaeologists working in the ancient city of Hierakonpolis discovered five ceramic vats containing residues consistent with brewing beer. | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 10 hours ago

How can sea mammals drink saltwater? (2001)

Marine biologist Robert Kenney of the University of Rhode Island offers the following explanation: | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 14 hours ago

Are Blackouts Here to Stay? A Look into the Future

Scientists and policy makers assess whether California’s utilities will have to regularly cut power over the next decade to lessen huge wildfires | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 1 day ago

CDC Report Finds 35,000 Americans Die of Antibiotic-Resistant Infections Each Year

While the number of deaths has gone down since 2013, new infections—such as the deadly Candida auris—have appeared | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 1 day ago

Plasma Scalpel Takes On Cancer

A pilot study is ongoing with the new tool | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 2 days ago

Children Are Particularly Vulnerable to Climate Change's Health Impacts

Global warming is already affecting public health, and efforts to address the problem are inadequate, a new report says | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 2 days ago

Apple Launches Virtual Health Studies Aiming to Enroll Hundreds of Thousands of Customers

Amid privacy concerns, the tech giant plans to monitor mobility, menstruation and hearing via users Apple watches and iPhones | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 2 days ago

The Straight Dope on CBD

The compound is found in everything from coffee to cookies, but the research on its efficacy is scant | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 2 days ago

The U.S. Needs a Mental Health Czar

A psychologist general, on par with the surgeon general, would ease our minds | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 2 days ago

Climate Change May Be Blowing Up Arms Depots

More intense heat waves can destabilize the components of munitions, particularly where explosives are not properly stored | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 days ago

Famously Fickle Felines Are, In Fact, Clingy

Cats are clingier to their human owners than their reputation would suggest. Karen Hopkin reports.  | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 days ago

Literacy Might Shield the Brain from Dementia

An ability to read and write, even with little or no schooling, could offer protection | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 days ago

Literacy Might Shield the Brain from Dementia

An ability to read and write, even with little or no schooling, could offer protection | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 days ago

Sea-thru algorithm counteracts distorting impact of water on underwater photos

A new algorithm counteracts the distorting impact of water | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 days ago

Democratic Presidential Contenders Chart Different Paths to Clean Energy

While the frontrunners all want to reduce carbon emissions, their proposed policies vary on issues like nuclear power | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 days ago

Key Photosynthesis Complex Viewed in Spinach

Findings fuel hopes for improved food-crop efficiency | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 days ago

Hearing Is Seeing: Sound Waves Create a 3-D Display

An interactive system produces levitating images by projecting color onto a tiny bead as it zips around a darkened box | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 days ago

Meet Arrokoth: Ultima Thule, the Most Distant Object Ever Explored, Has a New Name

The small body beyond Pluto visited by NASA's New Horizons spacecraft is now officially known as Arrokoth | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 days ago

The Stressful Discovery of Type A Personality  

How worn-out upholstery in doctors’ waiting rooms revealed common psychological traits | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 days ago

"Sea-thru" Brings Clarity to Underwater Photos

A new algorithm counteracts the distorting impact of water | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 4 days ago

Aversion to Broccoli May Have Genetic Roots

Study subjects with a gene variant that heightened their sensitivity to bitterness tended to eat fewer vegetables than people who didn't mind bitter flavors. Christopher Intagliata reports. | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 4 days ago

Pay More Attention to Climate Perils People with Disabilities Face, Experts Warn

Increased disease exposure and extreme weather events pose heightened risks for already vulnerable communities | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 4 days ago

Ebola Vaccine Approved in Europe in Landmark Moment

The approval of Merck’s vaccine comes after decades of research aimed at preventing the deadly disease | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 4 days ago

Proposed Interstellar Mission Reaches for the Stars, One Generation at a Time

Starting in the early 2030s, the project could become our first purposeful step out of the solar system—if it launches at all | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 4 days ago

Goodbye, Phone Calls. Hello, Loneliness

Can you really “reach out and touch someone” via text? | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 4 days ago

What the Protests and Violence in Chile Mean for Science

As universities shut down, researchers are demonstrating—and meeting with lawmakers to figure out if science can help solve socio-economic inequality | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 4 days ago

Add Another Animal to the List of Tool Users: Pigs

A chance discovery brings new interest in porcine intelligence | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 5 days ago

Proposed Interstellar Mission Reaches for the Stars, One Generation at a Time

Starting in the early 2030s, the project could become our first purposeful step out of the solar system—if it launches at all | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 5 days ago

150 Years of the Journal Nature

Nature is arguably the world's most prestigious scientific journal. Editor-in-chief Magdalena Skipper spoke with Scientific American acting editor-in-chief Curtis Brainard about her journal as it celebrates its 150th anniversary. | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 5 days ago

How Big is the Proton? Particle-size Puzzle Leaps Closer to Resolution

Precise measurement affirms that the particle’s radius is smaller than physicists once thought | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 5 days ago

The Road to Fusion

The construction of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), the world’s largest nuclear fusion experiment, is now 60 percent complete | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 5 days ago

The Mercury Transit of 2019 Has Begun!

Watch while you can—the next transit of the closest planet to the sun will not occur until 2032 | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 5 days ago

Frozen Researchers Will Greatly Improve Arctic Weather Prediction

Their data will also bolster climate models that forecast extreme weather where we all live | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 6 days ago

Recommended Books, November 2019

The ecosystem of a crime scene, how undercover patients changed psychiatric care, and more | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 6 days ago

Marine Mammal Epidemic Linked to Climate Change

A measles-like virus is ricocheting through marine mammal populations in the Arctic—and melting sea ice might be to blame. Christopher Intagliata reports.  | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 7 days ago

Should You Be Going Barefoot More Often?

Get-Fit Guy spent some time chatting with Vivobarefoot CEO Galahad Clark about the importance of going barefoot and the health science presented the new documentary Shoespiracy | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 7 days ago

Readers Respond to the July 2019 Issue

Letters to the editor from the July 2019 issue of Scientific American | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 7 days ago

Health Officials Claim Breakthrough on Vaping Illness Culprit

CDC says vitamin E acetate turned up in every sample of lung fluid from 29 patients | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 8 days ago

Are Probiotics Safe for Your Immune System?

There are some situations where beneficial bacteria (either from foods or supplements) can post a threat to the host | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 8 days ago

Rich Residents Build Defenses Against Rising Seas; Poor Ones Leave

Socioeconomic status and racial diversity affect how different communities adapt to a changing climate | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 8 days ago

Corruption Is Contagious

Dishonesty begets dishonesty, rapidly spreading unethical behavior through a society | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 8 days ago

Brazilian Ants Build Unusual Trap for Bugs

Feathers surrounding the insects’ nests mask a pitfall | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 9 days ago

Ants Colonies Avoid Traffic Jams

Researchers tracked thousands of individual ants to determine how they move in vast numbers without stumbling into gridlock. | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 9 days ago

Western Individualism Arose from Incest Taboo

Researchers link a Catholic Church ban on cousins marrying in the Middle Ages to the emergence of a way of life that made the West an outlier | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 9 days ago

Western Individualism Arose from Incest Taboo

Researchers link a Catholic Church ban on cousins marrying in the Middle Ages to the emergence of a way of life that made the West an outlier | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 9 days ago

Solving the Mystery of Songbird Diversity

A strange chromosome may have provided fodder for the evolution of new traits | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 9 days ago

Can Secondhand Shopping Dent Fast Fashion's Environmental Damage?

Reusing clothes saves on emissions and water use, but researchers have lingering questions on exactly how much it can contribute to making the apparel industry more sustainable | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 10 days ago

Ranking Rise May Intimidate Opponents

In an analysis of chess and tennis matches, players rising in the rankings did better than expected against higher-ranked opponents, and better than similarly ranked players not currently rising.   | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 10 days ago