Coronavirus News Roundup, June 5 to June 18

Pandemic highlights for the past two weeks | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 19 hours ago

COVID, Quickly, Episode 9: Delta Variant, Global Vaccine Shortfalls, Beers for Shots

Today we bring you a new episode in our podcast series: COVID, Quickly. Every two weeks,  Scientific American ’s senior health editors  Tanya Lewis  and  Josh Fischman  catch you up on the essential developments in the pandemic: from … | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 22 hours ago

National Park Nature Walks, Episode 7: Into the Wilderness by Canoe

Here is our next installment of a new pop-up podcast miniseries that takes your ears into the deep sound of nature. Host Jacob Job , an ecologist and audiophile, brings you inches away from a multitude of creatures, great and small, amid the sonic grandeur of nature. You may … | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 1 day ago

Mockingbirds Are Better Musicians Than We Thought

Their complex songs have striking similarities to Beethoven; Tuvan throat-singing; a Disney musical; and Kendrick Lamar | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 1 day ago

A Modest Proposal: Let's Change Earth's Orbit

What’s the worst that could happen? | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 1 day ago

Could Mitochondria Be the Key to a Healthy Brain?

Some researchers suspect these bacterial ancestors living within our cells may contribute to a wide range of neurological and psychiatric disorders | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 1 day ago

Supreme Court Upholds the Affordable Care Act--Again

By a vote of 7-2, the court declined to overturn the landmark health care law for the third time | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 1 day ago

China Launches Astronauts to New Space Station

The nation’s first crewed liftoff in nearly five years is the third of 11 planned launches to complete the station’s construction | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 1 day ago

GM Bets Big on Electric Vehicles

The automaker will spend $35 billion through 2025 on batteries, cars, even trains | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 1 day ago

Why the Supergiant Star Betelgeuse Went Mysteriously Dim Last Year

High-resolution images suggest the star spewed out so much dust that its brightness dropped by two-thirds in 2020 | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 2 days ago

The Quiet after the Storm

After a year of living cautiously and more isolated, here’s how to resume public routines | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 2 days ago

From $1-Million Lotteries to Free Beer: Do COVID Vaccination Incentives Work?

Doling out cash rewards and lifting mask mandates could increase vaccine uptake, some research suggests | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 2 days ago

From $1-Million Lotteries to Free Beer: Do COVID Vaccination Incentives Work?

Doling out cash rewards and lifting mask mandates could increase vaccine uptake, some research suggests | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 2 days ago

Hidden Black Scientists Proved The Polio Vaccine Worked

Tuskegee Institute researchers showed Jonas Salk’s vaccine protected children by developing a key test | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 2 days ago

AI Could Spot Wildfires Faster Than Humans

A prediction system undergoes testing as the U.S. West braces for another potentially devastating wildfire season | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 2 days ago

Don't Worry about CO2, Worry about the Earth's 'Energy Balance'

The “most fundamental” climate metric takes a troubling turn | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 2 days ago

Can Science Survive the Death of the Universe?

Three physicists envision ways in which the quest for knowledge can last forever | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 2 days ago

Animal Kids Listen to Their Parents Even before Birth

Human children: please take note of the behavior of prebirth zebra finches | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 2 days ago

Labor Department Issues Emergency Rules to Protect Health Care Workers From COVID

The new rules would require employers to notify workers of possible exposure to the disease and to report deaths or hospitalizations to the government | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 2 days ago

A Better Way to Pay for Health Care

Fee-for-service models, as in the U.S., and single-payer models like the U.K.’s and Canada’s both have significant flaws—but Singapore may have found a workable compromise  | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 days ago

Electrodes That Stimulate the Brain Reveal the Roots of Conscious Experience

Applying electric currents reveals the function of varying brain regions and helps to alleviate neurological disorders | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 days ago

The Reason Some Republicans Mistrust Science: Their Leaders Tell Them To

GOP officials have been denigrating the government, including government scientists, for decades | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 days ago

COVAX Effort to Vaccinate the World is Faltering

The international collaboration does not have enough COVID vaccine doses to meet its goals, so wealthy countries must step up to fill the gap | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 days ago

Make the Pause on Gain of Function Research Permanent (2015)

Some experiments are simply too dangerous to warrant the risk | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 days ago

To Restore Biodiversity, Embrace Biotech's 'Intended Consequences'

It's a new conservation framework that emphasizes innovation and boldness | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 days ago

Hurricane Damage Would Be Less with Stronger Building Codes

Florida’s codes rank high but Texas, Mississippi and Alabama’s are low | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 days ago

Hurricane Damage Would Be Less Extensive with Stronger Building Codes

Florida’s codes rank high, but those of Texas, Mississippi and Alabama are low | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 days ago

On the Louisiana Coast, an Indigenous Community Loses Homes to Erosion

For the Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw, climate change has forced a permanent retreat inland | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 4 days ago

On the Louisiana Coast, an Indigenous Community Loses Homes to Erosion

For the Biloxi-Chitimacha-Choctaw, climate change has forced a permanent retreat inland | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 4 days ago

Human Evolution Led to an Extreme Thirst for Water

We are more dependent on water than many other mammals and have developed a host of clever strategies for obtaining it | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 4 days ago

Why Humans Are So Thirsty

Artificial proteins, carbon-sucking rocks, particle accelerators, and more | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 4 days ago

Psychiatry Needs to Get Right with God

By not making more of an effort to incorporate spirituality in treatment, we are doing a disservice to patients | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 4 days ago

SpaceX Starlink Mega Constellation Faces Fresh Legal Challenge

The company’s ongoing launches of thousands of satellites for global high-speed Internet service may clash with preexisting environmental regulations | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 4 days ago

Navigating a Virtual World Helped Older Adults' Memory

A virtual-reality game may boost one long-term memory measure | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 4 days ago

Giant Ice Shelf Crumbling Faster than Expected

Antarctica’s enormous Pine Island Glacier could follow right behind it, raising global sea level significantly | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 4 days ago

Marching to the Beat of the 17-Year Cicada Clock

A visit to my hometown to see the legendary Brood X cicadas with my wife and one-year-old daughter changed my conception of time | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 4 days ago

Mysterious Fast Radio Bursts Come in Two Distinct Flavors

A trove of new detections suggests that the bursts could be the result of at least two separate astrophysical phenomena | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 4 days ago

Why Scientists Tweak Lab Viruses to Make Them More Contagious

Some “gain of function” studies explore how a dangerous pathogen might cross species barriers to start an outbreak | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 4 days ago

Saving New York City's Last Wildernesses

Added up, the natural areas in the five boroughs equal more than a dozen Central Parks | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 5 days ago

How Human Space Launches Have Diversified

A plethora of new countries and private companies are getting in on the quest to send people to orbit | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 5 days ago

Why Scientists Tweak Lab Viruses to Make Them More Contagious

Some “gain of function” studies explore how a dangerous pathogen might cross species barriers to start an outbreak | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 5 days ago

Searching for City Lights on Other Planets

There’s a detectable difference between a planet shining with reflected light and a planet glowing with its own artificial illumination | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 6 days ago

Invasive Species Can Sometimes Help an Ecosystem

In Hawaiʻi, imported birds have taken on some of the roles once performed by those that have gone extinct—but there’s a catch | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 7 days ago

Poem: 'Turing and the Apple'

Science in meter and verse | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 7 days ago

Venus Wins Stunning Third New Mission, This Time from Europe

EnVision will follow NASA’s DAVINCI+ and VERITAS | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 7 days ago

A Random Walk through the English Language

How a dispute between a religious believer and a confirmed atheist led to a major mathematical breakthrough | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 8 days ago

For African Elephants, Pee Could Be a Potent Trail Marker

Scientists found that elephants often sniff pathways—and seem especially attuned to urine. | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 8 days ago

New Radioactivity Measurement Could Boost Precision of Dark Matter Experiments

The process finds minuscule amounts of radioactive material in metals | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 8 days ago