Susceptibility to Mental Illness May Have Helped Humans Adapt over the Millennia

Psychiatrist Randolph Nesse, one of the founders of evolutionary medicine, explains why natural selection did not rid our species of onerous psychiatric disorders | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 17 days ago

Researchers Enable "Super Mice" to See Near-Infrared Light

Nanoscale devices convert near-infrared light into visible, green light. When injected into the eyes, they enabled mice to see in the infrared | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 17 days ago

SpaceX's Crew Dragon Signals Sea Change in U.S. Spaceflight

An uncrewed test flight to the International Space Station will be a crucial milestone for the company’s grand vision of private spaceflight | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 18 days ago

Leave No House Behind in Flood Buyout Programs, Group Says

Buyouts in flood-prone areas should be more proactive and target homes near environmental assets like streams | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 18 days ago

Untangling the Ties between Autism and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Autism and OCD frequently accompany each other; scientists are studying both to understand how they differ | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 18 days ago

Local Flood Forecasting Has Been Dangerously Imprecise--That's About to Change

Scientists are crafting clearer, faster ways to warn of serious damage from flooding | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 18 days ago

Rising High: GM Yeast Generates Known and Novel Marijuana Compounds

Engineered microorganisms churn out THC, CBD and rarer, less-understood cannabis cousins | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 18 days ago

How to Be Happy When the World Makes You Depressed

Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen offers 4 tips to be happy in a world that can feel like a “Mad Max” chase through the headlines | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 18 days ago

Physicists Solve a 35-Year-Old Mystery Hidden Inside Atomic Cores

New research reveals that pairs of protons and neutrons within atomic nuclei influence the speed of quarks passing through | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 18 days ago

Clouds May Hold the Key to Future Warming

New findings that certain clouds could disintegrate under extreme warming come with key caveats | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 19 days ago

Why Do We Crave Sweets When We're Stressed?

A brain researcher explains our desire for chocolate and other carbs during tough times | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 19 days ago

My Patient Was Suicidal, and His Step-Father Wouldn't Remove the Family Gun Collection

How can we do better? | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 19 days ago

Did Crawling Critters Leave These Cracks? The Answer Could Rewrite Evolutionary History

Researchers say they found evidence life began moving 2.1 billion years ago, but that contentious conclusion is far from certain | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 20 days ago

Grandma's Influence is Good for Grandkids

Grandmothers can enhance the survival of grandchildren. That is, unless grandma’s too old or lives too far away. Karen Hopkin reports. | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 20 days ago

6 Possible Scientific Reasons for Ghosts

Many people believe in ghosts, but could there be scientific explanations for some of our paranormal experiences? | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 21 days ago

The Ocean Is Running Out of Breath, Scientists Warn

Widespread and sometimes drastic marine oxygen declines are stressing sensitive species—a trend that will continue with climate change | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 21 days ago

Should Robots Have License to Kill

Artificial intelligence experts, ethicists and diplomats debated autonomous weapons. Christopher Intagliata reports. | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 22 days ago

Is a More Generous Society Possible?

Generosity helps communities cope with risks and disasters; new research untangles the factors involved | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 23 days ago

Four New DNA Letters Double Life's Alphabet

Synthetic DNA seems to behave like the natural variety, suggesting that a broader swathe of chemicals could support life than the four that evolved on Earth | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 24 days ago

California Threatens to Sue Over Car Emissions Standards

Negotiations with the Trump administration around fuel efficiency requirements broke down this week | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 24 days ago

Party-Drug-Turned-Antidepressant Approaches Approval

Johnson & Johnson has submitted its esketamine for regulatory approval, but researchers still don't understand how the fast-acting antidepressant lifts moods | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 24 days ago

In Search of Life's Origins, Japan's Hayabusa 2 Spacecraft Lands on an Asteroid

The mission to Asteroid Ryugu could return samples of the space rock to Earth in 2020 | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 24 days ago

Gene in Infamous Experiment on Embryos Points to New Stroke Treatment 

Biology at the center of last year’s contentious gene-edited twins result may hold other benefits for brain injury | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 24 days ago

The Real Dino Killer: A One–Two Punch

An asteroid impact and volcanoes acting together could have done in the beasts, new rock dates indicate | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 24 days ago

Weak El Niños Like This Year's May Become Rarer with Warming

The droughts and deluges spurred by the events could be worse even if the El Niño cycle does not change | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 25 days ago

First Private Moon Lander Heralds New Lunar Space Race

An Israeli firm is sending a privately built craft to the Moon—and leading a fresh era of exploration | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 25 days ago

Zombie Stars Shine on after Mystery Detonations

A newly discovered class of odd stars appears to have persevered through supernova explosions—providing a rare glimpse into these astrophysical catastrophes | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 25 days ago

Warming Climate Implies More Flies--and Disease

The incidence of foodborne illness could jump in a warming world, due to an increase in housefly activity. Christopher Intagliata reports. | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 25 days ago

Vaccine Rejection: Truth and Consequences

Kent State epidemiologist Tara Smith talks about vaccines, recent preventable measles outbreaks and her 2017 journal article on vaccine rejection. | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 25 days ago

2019 Fitness Goals and Trends from 7 Experts

Before you set your fitness goals in stone, here are a few wishes from some fitness professionals that you may want to keep in mind | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 25 days ago

How Drug Company Ads Downplay Risks

Study shows the power of the “argument dilution effect” | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 26 days ago

Border Wall Could Sap Military Funding for Climate Adaptation

Under the emergency declaration, some money to build the wall will come from a military construction account | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 26 days ago

FDA Issues Warning about Young-Blood Transfusions

Plasma from young people offers “no proven clinical benefit” as a treatment against aging or Alzheimer’s disease, the agency says | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 26 days ago

Should We Kill Off Disease-Causing Pests? Not So Fast

Eradicating harmful species may have unintended consequences | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 26 days ago

Inside the Ant Lab: Mutants and Social Genes

Social insects such as ants and bees often have complex societies, but understanding the genetics behind their social interactions can be difficult due to their complex lifecycles. This lab in New York hopes to investigate the genetics of ant social behavior by focusing on an unu … | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 26 days ago

FEMA's Panel of Flood Experts Unable to Meet as Losses Mount

A key report on needed improvements to flood maps has been stalled since September | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 27 days ago

Light Skin Variant Arose in Asia Independent of Europe

A new genetic study of Latin Americans provides evidence that gene variants for lighter skin color came about in Asia as well as in Europe. Christopher Intagliata reports. | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 27 days ago

Out of the Way, Human! Delivery Robots Want a Share of Your Sidewalk

As automated delivery ramps up, cities must decide how to make the best use of public spaces | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 27 days ago

Teach Science Process Over Findings

Seismologist and policy advisor Lucy Jones says science education needs to teach how science works more than just what it finds out. | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 27 days ago

Where Climate Change Fits into Venezuela's Ongoing Crisis

A severe and persistent drought has led to rationing of water and electricity from hydropower | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 28 days ago

Antarctica's Ice Shelves Get a Bounce from Ephemeral Lakes

GPS measurements the flexing movement of one of the ice shelves that act as key backstops to sea level rise | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 28 days ago

Do Dams Increase Water Use?

Reservoirs may promote waste by creating a false sense of water security | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 28 days ago

Does Eating Organic Reduce Cancer Risk?

A recent study claims to confirm that eating organic can reduce your risk of getting cancer. But a closer look at the details reveals a different story | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 1 month ago

Grazing Deer Alter Forest Acoustics

Deer populations have exploded in North American woodlands, changing forest ecology—and how sounds, like birdsong, travel through the trees. Christopher Intagliata reports. | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 1 month ago

Is This the Footprint of One of the Last Neandertals?

The fossilized print, found in Gibraltar, is said to date to 28,000 years ago, which might mean it belonged to a Neandertal. But not everyone agrees with that interpretation | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 1 month ago

Scientists Track the Source of Soot that Speeds Arctic Melt

Heat-absorbing black carbon comes from fossil fuels in winter and biomass burning in summer | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 1 month ago

Venezuela Is Unraveling--So Is Its Science

Research has ground to a halt, and many scientists have left the country out of desperation | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 1 month ago

Ancient Earth's Weakened Magnetic Field May Have Driven Mass Extinction

When our planet’s magnetosphere nearly disappeared 565 million years ago, it may have almost taken all life with it | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 1 month ago