A Study in Primates Reveals How the Brain Encodes Complex Social Interactions

The research tracks, at the level of individual neurons, what happens when a monkey hangs out with other monkeys. It even found a possible neural code for empathy | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Math Can’t Solve Gerrymandering

Researchers use powerful geometrical methods to try fixing unfair districts. That alone isn’t enough; we need to fight the values behind gerrymandering | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

NASA Restores Communications with Ailing Voyager 1 Spacecraft

NASA is reaching across more than 15 billion to rescue its malfunctioning Voyager 1 probe—but this hallowed interstellar mission can’t live forever | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Does Pi Contain All of Shakespeare?

If pi is a “normal” number, the constant would contain much more than Shakespeare, resolving why such a random-looking number lives at the heart of simple circles | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Tornadoes, Floods and Hurricanes Loom, but the Government Is Running Out of Money to Help

The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s disaster response fund could run out this summer. It dealt with a similar situation last year, which led to a slowdown in rebuilding projects | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

How Blatantly False Headlines Can Distort What We Believe In

New research highlights the necessity of stopping huge falsehoods during the presidential election cycle | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Moving Trees North Could Save Forests from a Changing Climate

"Assisted migration" could help sustain productive forests in the face of warming habitats | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

How the Solar Eclipse Will Impact Electricity Supplies

This April’s total solar eclipse will present a unique challenge to power grid operators because of the decline in solar power generation | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

COVID-19 Leaves Its Mark on the Brain. Significant Drops in IQ Scores Are Noted.

Research shows that even mild COVID-19 can lead to the equivalent of seven years of brain aging | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

How Do Chemicals in Plastics Impact Your Endocrine System?

Mounting evidence shows the endocrine-disrupting chemicals in plastics are harmful to human health | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Vaccine-resistant Mothers Blame Bad Experiences in Health Care

In interviews, mothers who rejected vaccines for their children cited their own negative experiences with the medical system | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Why Children’s Medications Are Not Fully Tested

Most pharmaceuticals are developed and approved for use only in adults. Some researchers are working to change that | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Successful Reforestation Is Keeping the Eastern U.S. Cooler

Parts of the southeastern and central U.S. haven’t warmed as much as the rest of the country. Reforestation could be partially responsible for this “warming hole” | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Electric Vehicles Beat Gas Cars on Climate Emissions over Time

New research says building electric vehicles leaves a bigger carbon footprint than making gas-powered cars, though EVs make up the difference in the long run | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Males Aren’t Larger than Females in Most Mammal Species

A new study corrects a biased assumption promoted by Charles Darwin 150 years ago and repeated ever since. | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

How Do Solar Eclipse Glasses Protect Our Eyes?

Solar eclipse glasses prevent catastrophic eye damage when observing the sun. Here’s how they work | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

How Japan’s ‘Moon Sniper’ Mission Hit Its Mark

Japan’s SLIM lander has sparked a new era of precision landings, with big implications for lunar science and exploration | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

How to Make Hybrid Work a Success, According to Science

Researchers are studying how to maximize creativity and connection in remote and hybrid work settings | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

The Simplest Math Problem Could Be Unsolvable

The Collatz conjecture has plagued mathematicians for decades—so much so that professors warn their students away from it | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Medicaid Expansion Alone Won't Stop the Opioid Overdose Crisis

Expanding the state and federal insurance program helps prevent overdoses. But that only happens with enough treatment, and legal reform, to make it work | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Total Solar Eclipses Are Cosmic Coincidences That Won’t Last Forever

Earthlings are very lucky to see the spectacle of a total solar eclipse | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Hunger in Gaza Could Affect Survivors' Health for Decades

Epigenetics research reveals how famines can cause health problems later in life — and how those changes might be passed down to future generations. | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

People Hate Daylight Saving. Science Tells Us Why.

Something is awry about the way we mark time. Can research and policy changes help us reset the clocks? | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Titanosaurs—The Biggest Land Animals in Earth’s History—Thrived by Combining Reptilian and Mammalian Traits

The secret to titanosaurs’ remarkable biological success may be how they merged the best of both reptilian and mammalian characteristics to form a unique way of life | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

New Nonprofit Spotlights AI Trained on Copyrighted Work with Permission

The new nonprofit Fairly Trained certifies that artificial intelligence models license copyrighted data—which often isn’t the case | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

CRISPR Will Likely Not Solve Bird Flu

New research shows that CRISPR, the gene editing technique, could make chickens more resistant to bird flu. But its use raises many ethical and scientific issues | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Is ‘Bed Rotting’ Good or Bad for Your Sleep?

“Bed rotting,” or staying in bed all day, has been touted as a self-care routine on TikTok, but it might actually make you feel worse. Here’s why that happens and how you can snap out of it | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Sunlight-Dimming Climate Schemes Need Worldwide Oversight

As the climate crisis intensifies, experiments to “cool the planet” by reflecting solar radiation proliferate. Without proper global and national regulation, they will worsen the crisis | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

A ‘Double Brood’ of Periodical Cicadas Will Emerge in 2024

The U.S. will see two adjacent broods of periodical cicadas emerge this spring | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Microplastics Linked to Heart Attack, Stroke and Death

People who had tiny plastic particles lodged in a key blood vessel were more likely to experience serious health problems or die during a three-year study | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

How the Seven Bridges of Königsberg Spawned New Math

Are you smarter than an 18th-century Prussian? | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

These Invasive Ants Are Changing How Lions Hunt

On the African savanna, a single invasive ant species has upset the delicate balance between predator and prey. | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Meet the Real-life Versions of Dune’s Epic Sandworms

A Dune-loving worm paleontologist makes the case that worms have been just as important on Earth as they are in the blockbuster film. | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Lead from Old Paint and Pipes Is Still a Deadly Hazard in Millions of US Homes

Protecting people from lead poisoning requires developing and using powerful tests | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Biden’s State of the Union Promises Big Job Gains from Clean Energy Policy

President Biden made big promises about what his climate and energy agenda could deliver during his State of the Union speech | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Paying Attention to Sensations Can Help Reset the Mind

Learning to observe bodily sensation is a powerful strategy for improving mental health | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

How Arguments that Embryos Are People Pose a Threat to IVF

Designating an IVF embryo as a person reveals the radical impact of an extreme antiabortion argument gone mainstream | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

NASA’s Hopes for Space Solar Power Are Looking Dim

Exorbitant launch costs and daunting engineering challenges make the dream of space- based solar power look dicey for the space agency | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

How Big Is Space?

The scale of the cosmos exceeds the bounds of human comprehension. But that doesn’t mean the universe is beyond our understanding | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Deepwater Sharks Are Threatened by Demand for Liver Oil

One in seven species of deepwater sharks and rays is threatened with extinction because of the liver oil and meat trade and emerging fishing technologies that make it possible to catch deep-sea fishes | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

The First Amphibian Known to Beg Its Mother for Milk Is More Bizarre than You Might Imagine

Surprisingly, the young of limbless amphibians called ringed caecilians stimulate their mother by touch and sound to release a milklike substance | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Extreme Summer Heat Threatens Coral Replanting Effort

A marine heat wave last year undercut efforts to regrow coral reefs off Florida’s coast. Conservationists are worried this year could be problematic, too | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

The Amazing Aerial Adventures of the 'Flying Feminist' Lillian Bland

In 1910 an Anglo-Irish woman named Lilian Bland built a plane with little to no encouragement from her family or aviation enthusiasts. Shortly after the plane took off, she quit flying and moved on to her next challenge | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Scientists Thought Only Humans Learn Complex Behaviors from Others. They Were Wrong

New studies in bees and chimps challenge the long-held assumption that only humans can learn from innovative peers | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

How Starvation Causes Lasting Damage to the Body

Large numbers of people in Gaza are experiencing malnutrition. Studies show famines can have long-lasting impacts on people’s health and even that of their descendants | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

We Need Small Astronomy as Much as Big Astronomy

In an era of budget-busting mega-telescopes, we shouldn’t forget the importance of smaller telescopes, more focused missions and the unexpected surprises they reveal about the universe | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

JWST Will Finally Hunt for Alien Moons—And Much More

The next year of science for the James Webb Space Telescope has been selected. It includes remote galaxy observations and, at last, a hunt for exomoons | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago

Many Labrador Retriever Dogs Really Are Hungry All the Time—It’s in Their Genes

One in four Labrador retrievers carries a gene that tricks their brain into thinking they’re starving | Continue reading


@scientificamerican.com | 3 months ago