Everything We Know About Facebook's Mood Manipulation Experiment

It was probably legal. But was it ethical? | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 20 hours ago

What AI Can Teach Us About the Myth of Human Genius

If literature were no longer the sole purview of the human, other fictions intrinsic to the world of letters might also be called into question. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 22 hours ago

Money Can Buy Happiness, Up To A Level

The joys of money are nothing without other people. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 1 day ago

The Dark Side of the Houseplant Boom

American culture is becoming more and more preoccupied with nature. What if all the celebrations of the wild world are actually manifestations of grief? | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 2 days ago

Men Who Turned Slavery into Big Business

The domestic slave trade was no sideshow in our history, and slave traders were not bit players on the stage. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 2 days ago

A new message proves too toxic for the Republican Party. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 2 days ago

A Distinctly American Problem, Police Killings, Needs Systematic Investigation

Every police killing, like every plane crash, warrants careful review by a federal agency. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 4 days ago

Are Outdoor Mask Mandates Still Necessary?

Governments need to give Americans an off-ramp to the post-pandemic world. Ending outdoor mask requirements would be a good place to start. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 4 days ago

Parents Are Sacrificing Their Social Lives on the Altar of Intensive Parenting

Inequality has seemingly caused many American parents to jettison friendships and activities in order to invest more resources in their kids. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 4 days ago

A World Without Work

For centuries, experts have predicted that machines would make workers obsolete. That moment may finally be arriving. Could that be a good thing? | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 4 days ago

The mRNA Vaccines Are Looking Better and Better

Concerns about blood clots with Johnson & Johnson underscore just how lucky Americans are to have the Pfizer and Moderna shots. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 4 days ago

Return the National Parks to the Tribes

The jewels of America’s landscape should belong to America’s original peoples. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 4 days ago

The Blood-Clot Problem Is Multiplying

So are theories to explain it. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 4 days ago

Parents Are Sacrificing Their Social Lives on the Altar of Intensive Parenting

Inequality has seemingly caused many American parents to jettison friendships and activities in order to invest more resources in their kids. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 4 days ago

Why Do So Many Rich People Work So Much?

And why have so many low-income men stopped looking for work entirely? | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 5 days ago

How Civilization Broke Our Brains

What can hunter-gatherer societies teach us about work, time, and happiness? | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 6 days ago

Cars Will Take the Streets Back Unless Cities Act Quickly

The pandemic forced communities to make space on their streets for people. That change should be permanent. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 7 days ago

America Has Pandemic Senioritis

Being so close (and yet so far) is a stress all its own. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 7 days ago

A Kidnapping Gone Wrong

In 1974, John Patterson was abducted by the People’s Liberation Army of Mexico—a group no one had heard of before. The kidnappers wanted $500,000, and insisted that Patterson’s wife deliver the ransom. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 7 days ago

Renting Is Terrible. Owning Is Worse

A third option is necessary: a way to rent without making someone else rich. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 7 days ago

Listen: The ‘Rock Doc’ Who Prescribed 1.4M Pain Pills

Jeffrey Young’s patients say he helped them like nobody else could, but prosecutors indicted him following a huge painkiller bust. His case offers a unique look at the opioid crisis. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 16 days ago

Diet Is Cooking the Planet

But two simple changes can help. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 16 days ago

The Playboy Centerfold That Helped Create the JPEG

The story of a 1970s computer-science lab, a spare magazine, and one model’s unlikely technological legacy | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 17 days ago

Index Funds May Harm the Economy

Economists and policy makers are worried that the Vanguard model of passive investment is hurting markets. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 17 days ago

The Capitol Rioters Weren’t ‘Low Class’

The business owners, real-estate brokers, and service members who rioted acted not out of economic desperation, but out of their belief in their inviolable right to rule. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 17 days ago

The Digital News Industry Was Built on Lies

To understand what went wrong with digital publishing, we need to go back to the fat years of newspaper journalism that preceded it. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 20 days ago

Anil Dash on inventing NFTs with artist Kevin McCoy in 2014

When we invented non-fungible tokens, we were trying to protect artists. But tech-world opportunism has struck again. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 20 days ago

The Paradox of Caring About ‘Bullshit’ Jobs

A new entry into the literature of work makes an uneasy case for small acts of reclamation. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 20 days ago

The Pandemic’s Wrongest Man

In a crowded field of wrongness, one person stands out: Alex Berenson. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 21 days ago

The Pandemic's Wrongest Man

In a crowded field of wrongness, one person stands out: Alex Berenson. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 22 days ago

A Nation Divided by Language

The word racism, among others, has become almost maddeningly confusing in current usage. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 23 days ago

The Mortifications of Beverly Cleary

The author recognized that humiliation is a kind of trauma—and that gentle humor could help neutralize it. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 23 days ago

The Fourth Surge Is Upon Us. This Time, It's Different.

A deadlier and more transmissible variant has taken root, but now we have the tools to stop it if we want. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 23 days ago

An Entire Group of Whales Has Somehow Escaped Human Attention

The only way to give them the space they need might be to seek them out. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 23 days ago

mRNA Technology Could Change the World

mRNA’s story likely will not end with COVID-19: Its potential stretches far beyond this pandemic. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 23 days ago

mRNA technology can change the world

The Atlantic covers news, politics, culture, technology, health, and more, through its articles, podcasts, videos, and flagship magazine. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 24 days ago

mRNA Technology Could Change the World

mRNA’s story likely will not end with COVID-19: Its potential stretches far beyond this pandemic. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 25 days ago

Portia hypothesis: A name has remarkable power over the path of its owner’s life

From dating to job prospects, a name has remarkable power over the path of its owner's life. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 25 days ago

The Bombs That Never Went Off

The fall of the Soviet Union left behind a grim legacy of nuclear danger. After 30 years, the last weapons-grade uranium has been eliminated. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 25 days ago

NUMTOTs Love Public Transit–and Each Other

Inside NUMTOTs, a Facebook dating group exclusively for people who are really into public transit. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 25 days ago

Why Ships Keep Crashing

One hundred large vessels are lost every year because the maritime industry won’t apply the lessons of aviation. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 26 days ago

You’ve Been Lied to About Lying

The conventional wisdom about how to spot a liar is all wrong. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 26 days ago

The Ancient Math That Sets the Date of Easter and Passover (2019)

Why don’t the two holidays always coincide? It is, to some degree, the moon’s fault. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 26 days ago

What You’re Saying When You Give Someone the Silent Treatment

Social ostracism has been a common punishment for millennia. But freezing someone out harms both the victim and the perpetrator. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 27 days ago

Returning to Normal Means Recalibrating My Brain

The pandemic’s retreat doesn’t necessarily mean life will get easier for people with OCD. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 27 days ago

No, Really Are We Rome?

History suggests that corrosive change can be hard to see while it’s happening. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 28 days ago

The Big, Stuck Boat Is Glorious

The Ever Given is very big and very stuck. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 28 days ago

My Asian Parents Still Won’t Talk About the Racism They’ve Faced

After Atlanta, their silence is deafening. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 28 days ago