Can Better Angels Fix Politics Without Ending Partisanship?

Rather than seeking a centrist compromise, Better Angels is treating division as a given—and trying to foster conversations across it. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 33 minutes ago

San Francisco, the City That Apps Built, or Destroyed

A lot of software developers, according to an unprecedented new analysis. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 19 hours ago

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Trump keeps issuing orders, and staffers keep ignoring them because they’re illegal or unwise. It’s an unsustainable situation—but it shows no sign of abating. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 1 day ago

The Helmet That ‘Resets’ Your Brain

Magnetic stimulation is helping some people with depression—but the $12,000 treatment is also being unleashed in untested ways. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 2 days ago

How the Columbine Shooting Changed American Teenhood

The year 1999 is, for many, a bright line that divides two radically different types of school experiences. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 2 days ago

The 'Cuddle Hormone' Might Help America Take on the Obesity Epidemic

The brain chemical oxytocin appears to make people feel full and reduce overeating. Can it encourage weight loss? | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 2 days ago

Behind Every Robot Is a Human

Why Amazon workers sometimes listen in on users’ conversations with Alexa, and what it tells us about the technology that powers “smart” devices | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 3 days ago

The Most Political Animal

Even in one of the world’s richest countries, humans have a hard time coexisting with wolves. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 3 days ago

The Last Days of the Blue-Blood Harvest (2018)

Every year, more than 400,000 crabs are bled for the miraculous medical substance that flows in their veins—now pharmaceutical companies are finally committing to an alternative that doesn't harm animals. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 3 days ago

The Coming Obsolescence of Animal Meat

Companies are racing to develop real chicken, fish, and beef that don’t require killing animals. Here’s what’s standing in their way. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 3 days ago

The Laser Scans That Could Help Rebuild Notre-Dame Cathedral

And the young, brilliant professor who made them before he died | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 4 days ago

Is Dentistry a Science?

It’s much less scientific—and more prone to gratuitous procedures—than you may think. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 4 days ago

A Single Solution for New York's Two Biggest Problems

The city is grappling with decaying infrastructure, and struggling to provide affordable housing. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 4 days ago

Instagram meme makers are unionizing

They’re hoping to solve some of the new economy’s problems with an old tactic: collective bargaining. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 4 days ago

Exploding Aphids Plaster Holes in Their Home with Bodily Fluids

In an extreme version of the clotting process, the bugs suicidally erupt to save their nest. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 4 days ago

The Children of the Children of Columbine

Twenty years after the shooting at Columbine High School, some survivors—now parents themselves—are figuring out how to talk to their kids about lockdown drills. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 4 days ago

The Cataclysmic Break That (Maybe) Occurred in 1950

69 years ago, a new geological era may have begun on Earth. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 4 days ago

Can Satellites Help You Make Better Stock Picks?

Investors are using real-time satellite images to predict the performance of companies like Walmart, Starbucks, and Whole Foods. It works. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 5 days ago

The Bat Men Before Batman

By chance or otherwise, The Dark Knight's 1939 arrival coincided with public interest in real winged daredevils who attempted superhuman feats without superpowers. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 5 days ago

Basing Laws on Nothing Is Easier Than Using Evidence

Partnerships between policy makers and researchers could improve the lives of millions—but they’re harder than you think. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 5 days ago

What a Year in Space Did to Scott Kelly

An unprecedented and illuminating study monitored identical twins, one in space and one on Earth. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 5 days ago

The Dark Saga of Katie Bouman

How a young scientist got sucked into the black hole of the internet | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 6 days ago

The Shipping and Handling Behind That Black-Hole Picture

The mesmerizing image of a cosmic wonder required a rather old-school approach to piece together. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 6 days ago

Recruiting Women to Online Dating Was a Challenge

Match.com started with questions about weight and explicit sexual preferences. Half the population wasn’t that into it. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 7 days ago

For $650k, Anyone Can Name a Species

Auctioning off an animal’s moniker can help fund conservation. But some scientists say it cheapens their work. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 7 days ago

Walt Whitman’s Guide to a Thriving Democracy

America had a mind shaped by its Founders, but the country needed the poet to discover its spirit. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 8 days ago

Julian Assange Got What He Deserved

Don’t continue to fall for his phony pleas for sympathy, his megalomania, and his promiscuity with the facts. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 8 days ago

Salmon on Psychotropics

Pharmaceutical pollution is altering some animals’ moods—and migratory patterns. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 9 days ago

Julian Assange Got What He Deserved

Don’t continue to fall for his phony pleas for sympathy, his megalomania, and his well-established promiscuity with the facts. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 9 days ago

A Boy Missing an Entire Type of Brain Cell

Microglia make up 10 percent of the brain, and an extremely rare case shows just how important they are. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 9 days ago

You Don't Have to Like Assange to Defend Him

The effort to extradite and prosecute the WikiLeaks founder threatens the free media. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 10 days ago

‘Don’t Ground the Airplanes. Ground the Pilots.’

I talked to a highly experienced pilot about the problem with the Boeing 737 Max 8. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 10 days ago

Julian Assange Isn't Worth It

If the U.S. government can prosecute the WikiLeaks editor in chief for publishing classified material, then every media outlet is at risk. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 10 days ago

Hot People Are Stressful

The brain appreciates beauty. But not always. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 10 days ago

Andrew Ferguson: The Joys of Reading a Print Newspaper

Some joys can’t be digitized. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 11 days ago

Richard Holbrooke and Pax Americana’s Decay

What the life of Richard Holbrooke tells us about the decay of Pax Americana | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 11 days ago

The New Science of How to Argue–Constructively

Disagreement is central to our lives online. ‘Erisologists’ want to study it more systematically. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 12 days ago

Re-Creating Facebook on Instagram

Class accounts are a way for incoming freshmen to make friends, find roommates, and suss out colleges before fall. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 13 days ago

The former vice president isn’t like other Washington power brokers. That’s what makes him great. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 13 days ago

The Disturbing Walrus Scene in ‘Our Planet’

A shocking sequence shows the huge mammals scaling steep cliffs, then falling to their death. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 13 days ago

The Death of an Adjunct

Thea Hunter was a promising, brilliant scholar. And then she got trapped in academia's permanent underclass. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 13 days ago

Mr. Rogers Had a Simple Set of Rules for Talking to Children

The TV legend possessed an extraordinary understanding of how kids make sense of language. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 13 days ago

Experiments to do with your baby (2013)

Recreate real scientific scenarios. Stimulate two minds. The little ones are fascinating. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 13 days ago

New research suggests that competent employees are assigned more work–but

New research suggests that reliable employees are assigned more work—but they don't always like it. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 15 days ago

The Scams Are Winning

American language suggests that grift can be separated from everything else. American life suggests otherwise. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 15 days ago

Why a Toaster Is a Design Triumph (2017)

The “A Bit More” button doesn’t reinvent the appliance’s form. It finds its soul instead. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 16 days ago

Unusual Cruelty at the Supreme Court

Justice Neil Gorsuch warmly embraces state killing—even if the state knowingly inflicts agony in the process. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 16 days ago

'Dozens' of Whistle-Blowers Are Secretly Cooperating With House Democrats

The number of anonymous tipsters reporting wrongdoing from inside the federal government has spiked during the Trump presidency, the House Oversight Committee says. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 16 days ago