A Man Who First Said 'Cyborg,' 50 Years Later (2010)

In September 1960, Manfred Clynes coined the word cyborg. We talk with the 85-year old about brain signals, treacherous words, precise music and how to transmit meaning. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 9 hours ago

The president’s team seems to see the senator from Vermont’s candidacy as a no-lose proposition. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 18 hours ago

Why Trump Isn't Trying to Bring Down Bernie Sanders

The president’s team seems to see the senator from Vermont’s candidacy as a no-lose proposition. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 19 hours ago

Photos of the 1918 Flu Pandemic

Between 1918 and 1919, an outbreak of influenza spread rapidly across the world, and killed more than 50 million—and possibly as many as 100 million—people within 15 months. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 1 day ago

The Hard Drive with 68B Melodies

Do-do-do-do-do-do-do-do-do-do-do-re, do-do-do-do-do-do-do-do-do-do-do-mi … you get the picture. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 1 day ago

The Opioid Epidemic Might Be Much Worse Than We Thought

A new paper suggests that death certificates dramatically undercounted the number of people dying from opioid overdoses. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 1 day ago

The Chart That Reveals Your Kid’s Adult Height

Researchers crunched longitudinal data to provide a simple predictive equation, and a chart. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 2 days ago

Restoration Hardware Catalogs Won’t Die

The surprising persistence of the mail-order business | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 2 days ago

The ‘Dating Market’ Is Getting Worse

The old but newly popular notion that one’s love life can be analyzed like an economy is flawed—and it’s ruining romance. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 3 days ago

It Doesn’t Matter If Anyone Exists or Not

What a website that generates infinite fake humans tells us about modern life | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 3 days ago

Most cases are not life-threatening, which is also what makes the virus a historic challenge to contain. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 4 days ago

In Britain, Even Jails Have a Class System

How a filmmaker, convicted of fraud, discovered the “White Collar Club.” | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 4 days ago

The Strange Influence the Sun Has on Whales

A solar storm can throw whales off-course, suggesting that the large animals might have an internal compass. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 4 days ago

What Guide Books Tell Foreign Visitors to the U.S.

Such tips as "don't hand out cash to dinner guests" reveal what foreign tourists find surprising about coming to America. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 4 days ago

Winners of the 2020 Underwater Photographer of the Year Contest

Some of this year’s winners and honorees, showing remarkable scenes from oceans, lakes, and rivers around the world | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 4 days ago

Mapping Wikipedia

An unprecedented data set shows where the encyclopedia’s editors are, where they aren’t, and why. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 5 days ago

Thy Neighbor's Solar Cells

When our peers take actions to preserve the planet, we’re more likely to follow suit. How the human instinct to conform could help us address the climate crisis. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 6 days ago

How the Coronavirus Revealed Authoritarianism’s Fatal Flaw

China’s use of surveillance and censorship makes it harder for Xi Jinping to know what’s going on in his own country. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 6 days ago

How the World Mourned Abraham Lincoln

The president's assassination 150 years ago sparked outpourings of grief across the globe | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 6 days ago

How the Coronavirus Revealed Authoritarianism's Fatal Flaw

China’s use of surveillance and censorship makes it harder for Xi Jinping to know what’s going on in his own country. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 6 days ago

Tech's Midlife Crisis

Silicon Valley has hit a midlife crisis. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 7 days ago

Tech Experts Are Pessimistic About Their Industry

Silicon Valley has hit a midlife crisis. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 7 days ago

The similarities between 2020 and 1972 are too astonishing to ignore. But there’s one big difference. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 7 days ago

Giant Phages: a discovery in the world of viruses

Giant phages have been found in French lakes, baboons from Kenya, and the human mouth. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 7 days ago

Corporate Buzzwords Are How Workers Pretend to Be Adults

Circle back and kill me now. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 8 days ago

The Pros and Cons of a Lunar Pit Stop

NASA definitely wants to go to Mars. But does it need the moon to get there? | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 9 days ago

Fan Fiction in the 1700s

Before the tales about Draco Malfoy and Harry Potter, people wrote bawdy or gross stories about "Gulliver’s Travels." | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 11 days ago

An Ode to Cold Showers

Fling wide the plastic curtain, take a breath, and step right in. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 11 days ago

Private Equity Ruined a Beloved Grocery Chain

An investment firm was supposed to help Fairway survive. So why is the company now filing for bankruptcy? | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 11 days ago

Bill Barr Must Resign

The attorney general is working to destroy the integrity and independence of the Justice Department, in order to make Donald Trump a president who can operate above the law. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 11 days ago

Stop-and-frisk was awful. But to disqualify the former New York mayor from the presidency on that basis is to risk something more destructive: a second term for Trump. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 11 days ago

A Coronavirus Quarantine in America Could Be a Giant Legal Mess

America’s defense against epidemics is divided among more than 2,000 individual public-health departments, which makes implementing a national strategy very difficult. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 11 days ago

Kids Don’t Need to Stay ‘On Track’ to Succeed

When parents portray success as a linear progression of SAT scores, acceptance to selective colleges, and high-powered internships, they set kids up for disappointment. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 11 days ago

Cracking the Voynich Manuscript

Researchers have spent centuries failing to decipher a medieval manuscript’s baffling drawings of plants, naked women, and astrological symbols. Is it worth the effort? | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 12 days ago

China wants food. Brazil pays the price

National efforts to strengthen food security have an impact far beyond any single country’s borders. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 12 days ago

Corporate Landlords Aren’t the Real Culprit for High Housing Prices

They get away with raising rents in places where local regulations impede the construction of new apartments. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 13 days ago

A Perfectly Nice, Well-Intentioned Rant About Hyphens (2012)

Let's take a minute to get Grammar-Real: It has come to my attention of late that many of us are using hyphens wrong. This is not, of course, the hyphen's fault. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 14 days ago

If the Nuclear Family Has Failed, What Comes Next?

Many Americans are reimagining life at home, exploring models of kinship and community that might help more people flourish. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 14 days ago

Coronavirus Is a Data Time Bomb

It will be a long time before we understand what the outbreak did to the global economy. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 14 days ago

The Cascading Consequences of the Worst Disease Ever

Nature is clearly in crisis—but what do researchers do when they only have imperfect data on the extent of the losses? | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 15 days ago

The former chief of staff explained, in the clearest terms yet, his misgivings about Trump’s behavior regarding North Korea, immigration, and Ukraine. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 15 days ago

A Sea Story

One of the worst maritime disasters in European history took place a decade ago. It remains very much in the public eye. On a stormy night on the Baltic Sea, more than 850 people lost their lives when a luxurious ferry sank below the waves. From a mass of material, including offi … | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 16 days ago

Laptops Killed Work-Life Balance

Smartphones aren’t the only killers of work-life balance. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 17 days ago

What the United States Did in Indonesia

A trove of recently released documents confirms that Washington’s role in the country’s 1965 massacre was part of a bigger Cold War strategy. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 17 days ago

Why SpaceX Wants a Tiny Texas Neighborhood So Badly

The residents of Boca Chica didn’t ask Elon Musk to move in, but now his company is taking over. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 17 days ago

New states are the answer to America’s minority-rule problem. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 17 days ago

The Nuclear Family Was a Mistake

The family structure we’ve held up as the cultural ideal for the past half century has been a catastrophe for many. It’s time to figure out better ways to live together. | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 18 days ago

How Bong Joon-ho Invented the Weird World of 'Parasite'

“It all came to me, and I wrote like it was a hurricane.” | Continue reading


@theatlantic.com | 19 days ago