Too many people think satirical news is real

You might see a headline from The Onion or The Babylon Bee and, for a split second, think it's true. But many social media users don't get the joke – and share these articles as if they're real. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 6 days ago

Cannibalism is common in the animal kingdom – for humans it’s the ultimate taboo

We could one day adapt to eating the flesh of our own kind - but not until our lives depend on it. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 6 days ago

It’ll be hard, but we can feed the world with plant protein

There are plenty of barriers, but if we really want to we can feed the world on plant protein (largely from legumes). | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 7 days ago

French pot debate ignores mass Muslim incarceration

Muslims make up 9% of France's population and half of all its prisoners – many convicted on drug charges. But social justice isn't part of the country's growing debate on legalization. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 11 days ago

Can architecture shape behaviour? (2014)

In 1966, a British planner called Maurice Broady came up with a new term for the architectural lexicon: architectural determinism. This was to describe the practice of groundlessly asserting that design… | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 11 days ago

A history of how a silent cosmos led humans to fear the worst

Realising the silence of outer space was what made us appreciate our precarious position down on this pale blue dot – so beginning our obsession with extinction. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 11 days ago

Science lesson: How anesthetics work, and why xenon's perfect (2017)

How do anesthetics work, and what makes for an ideal anesthetic? It's not as mysterious as once believed, and there's a gas that ticks all the boxes for a perfect anesthetic: xenon. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 12 days ago

Ideas explain spiral galaxies without the need for dark matter

New research does away with dark matter by putting 'entropy', a measure of disorder, at the heart of the universe. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 13 days ago

Green growth is trusted to fix climate change – here’s the problem with that

Economic growth created the climate crisis and continues to fuel it – 'green' growth is no solution. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 15 days ago

Libra: It’s not the ‘crypto’ that’s the issue, it’s the organisation behind it

Alarm bells should ring over a global currency that is run by an exclusive club that serves its investor-owners, not the public good. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 16 days ago

Everything in Mecca gets 5 stars – other holy sites get inflated ratings, too

Hajj pilgrims looking online for advice about their upcoming pilgrimage to Mecca, in Saudi Arabia, may not find TripAdvisor so useful. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 17 days ago

Can Plants Think?

Plants clearly lack brains but does all intelligence have to look like our own? | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 22 days ago

Plastic-Eating Bacteria That Can Break Down Pet (2016)

Scientists have discovered the first easy-to-grow bacteria that can break down plastics. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 22 days ago

Insurance black boxes and the surveillance state – how free are you, really?

Those money-saving black boxes reveal a lot about the rules that govern our lives. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 23 days ago

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Combining big data sources about bike-share trips with anonymized data from traditional survey research can best capture who is using bike-share programs. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 24 days ago

Big Gods Came After Rise of Civilizations – Study Using Historical Database

God only started watching over us quite recently, according to a new study that analysed 414 societies from 30 world regions. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 27 days ago

No, Lyme disease is not an escaped military bioweapon

Scientists know the bacterium that causes Lyme disease has been out in the wild since long before any biological weapons research could have focused on it. And that's just for starters. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 27 days ago

The Matrix 20 years on: how a sci-fi film tackled big philosophical questions

Cult film The Matrix was released 20 years ago this month. From Plato to Baudrillard, the film explored philosophical dilemmas we are still wrestling with today. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 28 days ago

Not everyone cares about climate change, but reproach won’t change their minds

In the end, climate policy didn't swing the federal election, and for those on the losing side it can be tempting to play the blame game. But listening and respect are much better ways to move forward. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 1 month ago

Database of police who shoot citizens reveals who’s most likely to shoot

A new project looks at the race of on-duty police officers and civilians involved in 917 fatal shootings in 2015. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 1 month ago

The midlife crisis confronting many Americans

What was once imagined as a time of exploration and reinvention has become marked by financial and emotional strain. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 1 month ago

Like to work with background noise? It could be boosting your performance

The 'right' amount of noise is different for everyone. That might explain why some people perform best in noisy environments, while others prefer silence. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 1 month ago

A layer of 'aerogel' could make Mars habitable

A new study shows how to create a habitable region on Mars, allowing us to grow plants to fuel human exploration. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 1 month ago

40 years on astronomers have revisited the pulsar from the iconic album cover

When you look at the squiggly lines on Joy Division's famous album cover, you're seeing a record of lightning in outer space. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 1 month ago

Background noise could be boosting your performance

The 'right' amount of noise is different for everyone. That might explain why some people perform best in noisy environments, while others prefer silence. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 1 month ago

We organised a conference for 570 people without using plastic

This year's national conference of the Australian Marine Science Association is a plastic-free zone, as marine scientists aim to reduce the environmental burden of throwaway plastic. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 1 month ago

Men do see the mess – they just aren’t judged for it the way women are

Dirt blindness is used by some to excuse men for spending a third as much time as women cleaning. A new study shows it's a myth. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 1 month ago

About the press and researchers' fascination with the Voynich manuscript

The Voynich Manuscript has researchers, the media, and the public hooked. But pseudo-explanations for the book's 'code' reveals a serious problem with society's relationship with science. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 1 month ago

Lionfish: The Mediterranean invasion of an untouchable and enigmatic predator

They swim, they eat, they multiply. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 1 month ago

Sofia: a 67-year-old widow who uses Pokémon Go to reconnect with her city

The digital overlays of Pokémon Go reinvented Sofia’s everyday experiences of mundane spaces. And she became an outstandingly super-cool grandmother in the eyes of her grandson, Diego. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 1 month ago

Would your mobile phone be powerful enough to get you to the moon?

Here is how our mobile phones compare with the computer that landed man on the moon in 1969. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 1 month ago

Fed up with being in the slow queue? That’s why queues are being ‘designed out’

Businesses are weighing up the costs of queuing and using innovative ways to minimise these costs by doing away with queues. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 1 month ago

US military is a bigger polluter than as many as 140 countries

If the US military were a country, its carbon emissions would rank between that of Peru and Portugal. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 1 month ago

We need more than just data to create ethical driverless cars (2018)

A new study provides fascinating data on how people prioritise who to save in hypothetical driverless car crashes. But it takes more than just numbers to really create ethical machines. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 1 month ago

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With the launch of the Libra cryptocurrency, Mark Zuckerberg reveals his dreams of building a new virtual country, perhaps inspired by the Roman Empire. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 1 month ago

Are you liable for defamation for what other people write on your Facebook page?

Journalists are not happy about a decision of the Supreme Court of New South Wales finding that media companies could be liable for defamatory comments made under news stories on their Facebook pages. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 1 month ago

Supplements for brain health show no benefit – a neurologist explains new study

With fear of a diagnosis of Alzheimer's a constant concern for many seniors, they turn to supplements. A recent study suggests they'd be better off keeping their money. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 2 months ago

Ten times Chernobyl television series lets artistic licence get in way of facts

Documentary or drama? The HBO/Sky series is gripping watching, but sometimes facts make way for artistic licence. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 2 months ago

Amazon wins ‘.amazon’ domain name, aggravating South American region

Who has the right to use an Amazon domain name? The people who live there or a company with the same name? | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 2 months ago

Social media can threaten medical experiments

Participants of clinical trials can easily communicate online, which poses a big problem for medical researchers. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 2 months ago

I’m a lucid dream researcher – here’s how to train your brain to do it

Research on lucid dreams is still in its infancy, but some induction techniques already hold real promise - and most can be tried in the comfort of your own bedroom. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 2 months ago

Google at 20: how a search engine became a literal extension of our mind

We're now so reliant on Google's services they are now a part of us, raising some deeply troubling questions. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 2 months ago

What does the dust in your home mean for your health?

Even the tidiest space has some dust. Researchers are investigating just what these indoor particles are made of and their possible implications for human health. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 2 months ago

With cryptocurrency, Facebook sets path toward becoming an independent nation

With the launch of the Libra cryptocurrency, Mark Zuckerberg reveals his dreams of building a new virtual country, perhaps inspired by the Roman Empire. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 2 months ago

In defence of the wolf: this big bad animal is more prey than predator

Wolves are not bad – they’re just trying to survive in a world where they are unwelcome. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 2 months ago

The Trebek effect: The benefits of well wishes

Alex Trebek raised an interesting question when he thanked well-wishers for supporting him in his fight against pancreatic cancer: Do prayers and good thoughts really have a medical effect? | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 2 months ago

When America had an open prison: California's 1940's 'prison without walls'

Scudder's approach was grounded in trust and mutual respect. There would be no guards, no weapons, no walls and no uniforms. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 2 months ago

We convinced a group of islamist radicals to let us scan their brains

The process of radicalisation is a complex system that cannot be reduced to the brain, behaviour, or environment. It exists at the intersection of all these elements. | Continue reading


@theconversation.com | 2 months ago