Underground in Jerusalem, a rare look at an ancient tomb

Flashlight beams pierce the darkness and reveal an archaeological gem in underground Jerusalem few have had the chance to glimpse in recent years. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Tiny killer threatens giant clam, aquatic emblem of the Med

With wing-shaped shells lined with iridescent mother-of-pearl and producing the fibres of rare and delicate sea silk, the noble pen shell clam is one of the most emblematic species in the Mediterranean and a bellwether for marine environmental health. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Microsoft 'waiting to find out' why Bing went offline in China

Microsoft is still trying to figure out why its Bing search engine temporarily went offline in China, the company's president said following speculation that it could have been blocked by censors. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Rare pangolins languish in China wildlife rescue system

When Chinese police found them in the trunk of a smuggler's car, 33 of the trafficked pangolins—endangered scaly mammals from southern China—were still alive, wrapped in plastic bags soaked with their own urine. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

An entire botanical garden of genomes

An article published today in the Open-Access journal GigaScience provides data that effectively triples the number of plant species with available genome data. This mammoth amount of work comes on the back of the growing efforts of the scientific community to sequence more plant … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Self-assembling nanomaterial offers pathway to more efficient, affordable harnessing of solar power

Solar rays are a plentiful, clean source of energy that is becoming increasingly important as the world works to shift away from power sources that contribute to global warming. But current methods of harvesting solar charges are expensive and inefficient—with a theoretical effic … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Fast action: Novel device may rapidly control plasma disruptions in a fusion facility

Scientists seeking to capture and control on Earth fusion energy, the process that powers the sun and stars, face the risk of disruptions—sudden events that can halt fusion reactions and damage facilities called tokamaks that house them. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Ener … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

First confirmed cases of rabbit virus found in UK hares

Collaborative research led by the University of East Anglia has identified one of the causes of recent deaths in UK European brown hare populations.Working together with diagnostic laboratories in England, Scotland and Germany, the first UK cases of rabbit haemorrhagic disease vi … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Envisioned 'octopus farms' would have far-reaching and detrimental environmental impact

Commercial octopus farming, currently in developmental stages on multiple continents, would have a negative ripple effect on sustainability and animal welfare, concludes a team of researchers in a newly published analysis. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Baby pudu named for Korean pop star debuts at LA Zoo

Fans of a Korean pop star have raised more than $2,000 to name a baby deer at the Los Angeles Zoo after their favorite doe-eyed singer. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

New study says modern-day crocodiles and alligators came from variety of surroundings

A new study throws into question the notion that today's crocodiles and alligators have a simple evolutionary past. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

This galaxy is no match for a hungry cluster

A new study led by Yale University astronomers tells the story of a galaxy that ran out of gas. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Physicists use supercomputers and AI to create the most accurate model yet of black hole mergers

One of the most cataclysmic events to occur in the cosmos involves the collision of two black holes. Formed from the deathly collapse of massive stars, black holes are incredibly compact—a person standing near a stellar-mass black hole would feel gravity about a trillion times mo … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

High heat but no record: 2018 was 4th warmest year on Earth

A new analysis shows that while Earth was a tad cooler last year than the last couple of years, it was still the fourth warmest year on record. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Ecuador eradicates Galapagos rats using drones

Ecuador used drones to scatter rat poison on one of the Galapagos Islands in a bid to protect species including the world's only nocturnal seagull from the pests, the archipelago's national parks authority, PNG, said Thursday. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Stellar winds, the source material for the universe, are clumpy

Data recorded by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory of a neutron star as it passed through a dense patch of stellar wind emanating from its massive companion star provide valuable insight about the structure and composition of stellar winds and about the environment of the neutron … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

On Twitter, limited number of characters spreading fake info

A tiny fraction of Twitter users spread the vast majority of fake news in 2016, with conservatives and older people sharing misinformation more, a new study finds. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Unlocking graphene's superconducting powers with a twist and a squeeze

Teaser: A Columbia-led team has discovered a new method to manipulate the electrical conductivity of this game-changing material, the strongest known to man with applications ranging from nano-electronic devices to clean energy. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Information wars endanger civilization, say 'Doomsday' experts

Information warfare is amplifying major worldwide threats like climate change and nuclear warfare, endangering the future of civilization, US experts said Thursday as the symbolic Doomsday Clock stayed at two minutes to midnight. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Materials that open in the heat of the moment

Kyoto University researchers have designed a temperature-controllable, copper-based material for sieving or storing gases. The principle used to design the material, described in the journal Science, could act as a blueprint for developing nanoporous materials with a wide variety … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Is the world ready for the 'digital transformation'?

The annual business rendezvous in Davos is a hothouse of insider tech jargon, but this year's buzzword of "digital transformation" could translate into profound and painful changes for companies and workers. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

As clouds fall apart, a new star is born

Using the ALMA observatory in Chile, a group of astronomers led by MPIA's Henrik Beuther has made the most detailed observation yet of the way that a giant gas cloud fragments into dense cores, which then act as the birthplaces of stars. The astronomers found that the mechanisms … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

General Motors to invest $22M more in Tennessee facility

General Motors says it plans to invest another $22 million in its Tennessee manufacturing facility to build more engines. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

NASA's storm-silenced rover marks 15th anniversary on Mars

NASA's Opportunity rover is silently marking the 15th anniversary of its touchdown on Mars. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

OECD hopes for global digital tax by 2020

OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurria said Thursday he hopes to lay the foundations this year for an international tax on digital giants that could come into force in 2020. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Apple puts brakes on car team but keeps eye on road

Apple acknowledged Thursday that it has trimmed its team devoted to self-driving car technology but stressed that its still in the race. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

How to escape a black hole: Simulations provide new clues about powerful plasma jets

Black holes are known for their voracious appetites, binging on matter with such ferocity that not even light can escape once it's swallowed up. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Computer analysis shows that popular music lyrics become angrier and sadder over time

Popular music has changed over the years, and the music of 2019 is noticeably different from the music of the 1960s or 1970s. But it is not just the music that changed, but also the lyrics. Data scientists at Lawrence Technological University in Michigan used quantitative analyti … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

White math teachers treat students differently in predominantly black schools

White math teachers in predominantly black middle schools are more likely to respond negatively to students' behavioral or academic issues—and this may have long-term negative consequences for student performance, according to a Rutgers-led study that highlights the need to recru … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Scientists tackle breeding challenges of land mine-finding rats

Thousands of people—many of them children—are hurt or killed by land mines each year, so finding these devices before they explode is critical. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Major northeastern snowstorms expected to continue with climate change

Even though climate change is expected to reduce the total amount of U.S. snowfall this century, it's unlikely to significantly rein in the most powerful nor'easters that pummel the East Coast, new research indicates. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Common policy premise on link between soil and crop yield is valid—to a point

In recent years, policymakers across the world have launched initiatives to increase the amount of "soil organic matter," or SOM, as a way to improve soil health and boost agricultural production. Surprisingly, however, there is limited evidence that this strategy will actually i … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Government shutdown delays, disrupts environmental studies

The rainwater collection system is broken at the environmental research station on a remote, rocky Pacific island off the California coast. So is a crane used to hoist small boats in and out of the water. A two-year supply of diesel fuel for the power generators is almost gone. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Inspiring people to make better lifestyle choices—through isotopes

Fitness goals are typically at the forefront of new year's resolutions for many Americans, and a recent study from ASU provides a new way to understand diet and exercise in a more holistic way, and may help us reach those goals. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

New theory unlocks the secret behind protein-membrane interactions

Trillions of cells—all different shapes and sizes—form a human body's structure. Surrounding each cell is a membrane, jointly acting as hostess and security—welcoming certain information into the cell while making sure its components don't spill out into the body's void. Much is … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Semiconductors combine forces in photocatalysis

A significant advance in the photocatalytic activity of conventional materials is demonstrated by a two-dimensional heterostructure comprising nanolayers of two semiconductors: black phosphorus and bismuth tungstate. As researchers have reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Sci-fi to reality: Superpowered salamander may hold the key to human regeneration

Regeneration is one of the most enticing areas of biological research. How are some animals able to regrow body parts? Is it possible that humans could do the same? If scientists could unlock the secrets that confer those animals with this remarkable ability, the knowledge could … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Researchers develop high-level gas detection system

A new gas detector, developed by researchers at UBC's Okanagan campus, enables highly accurate odour analysis for so many different applications it has been nicknamed the 'artificial nose.' | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

War declared on world's growing e-waste crisis

Weighing more than all commercial airliners ever built and worth more than most countries' GDP, electronic waste poses a growing economic and environmental threat, experts said Thursday, as they launched a global initiative to clean it up. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Periodic table: new version warns of elements that are endangered

It is amazing to think that everything around us is made up from just 90 building blocks – the naturally occurring chemical elements. Dmitri Mendeleev put the 63 of these known at the time into order and published his first version of what we now recognise as the periodic table i … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

New guidance supports the teaching of evolution

Researchers at the University of Liverpool have collaborated with teachers and pupils to develop practical strategies for the teaching and learning of evolution. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

'Doomsday Clock' stays at two mins to midnight

How close is human civilization to destroying the planet? The symbolic Doomsday Clock is still two minutes to midnight, as close as it has ever been, said the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists on Thursday. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

BA owner says will not bid for Norwegian

IAG, the owner of British Airways and Spanish carrier Iberia, said Thursday that it has decided not to make a formal bid for low-cost airline Norwegian Air Shuttle. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Hitachi wants nationalisation of UK nuclear project: report

Hitachi's frozen nuclear power project in Britain can only be revived if it is nationalised, the Nikkei business paper reported the company's chairman as saying on Wednesday. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

American Airlines warns of delays from shutdown

American Airlines executives warned of significant travel delays if the US government shutdown goes on much longer, but said Thursday that customer demand has not been significantly affected thus far. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Moving on the moon

Europe is preparing to go forward to the moon, but how will astronauts move once they get there? Despite the Apollo missions, little is known about what lunar gravity may mean for our bodies. ESA's space medicine team is working to find out through a series of studies. | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Preparing astronaut lunar exploration

Developing the most efficient and safest way to return to the Moon starts on Earth. European astronauts and spacewalk experts are getting ready for the future of Moon exploration with electronic aids, upgraded geological tools from the Apollo era and improved scientific protocols … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago

Breakthrough reported in fabricating nanochips

An international team of researchers has reported a breakthrough in fabricating atom-thin processors—a discovery that could have far-reaching impacts on nanoscale chip production and in labs across the globe where scientists are exploring 2-D materials for ever-smaller and -faste … | Continue reading


@phys.org | 5 years ago